bindweed


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Related to bindweed: field bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis

bind·weed

 (bīnd′wēd′)
n.
1. Any of various trailing or twining, often weedy plants of the genera Calystegia and Convolvulus, having white, pink, or purple funnel-shaped flowers.
2. Any of various similar trailing or twining plants.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bindweed

(ˈbaɪndˌwiːd)
n
1. (Plants) any convolvulaceous plant of the genera Convolvulus and Calystegia that twines around a support. See also convolvulus
2. (Plants) any of various other trailing or twining plants, such as black bindweed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bind•weed

(ˈbaɪndˌwid)

n.
any of various twining or vinelike plants, esp. certain species of the genera Convolvulus and Calystegia, of the morning glory family.
[1540–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bindweed - any of several vines of the genera Convolvulus and Calystegia having a twining habitbindweed - any of several vines of the genera Convolvulus and Calystegia having a twining habit
Convolvulaceae, family Convolvulaceae, morning-glory family - morning glory; bindweed; sweet potato; plants having trumpet-shaped flowers and a climbing or twining habit
Convolvulus arvensis, field bindweed, wild morning-glory - weakly climbing European perennial with white or pink flowers; naturalized in North America and an invasive weed
Calystegia sepium, Convolvulus sepium, hedge bindweed, wild morning-glory - common Eurasian and American wild climber with pink flowers; sometimes placed in genus Convolvulus
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
powój

bindweed

[ˈbaɪndwiːd] Nconvólvulo m, enredadera f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bindweed

[ˈbaɪndwiːd] nliseron m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bindweed

nWinde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bindweed

[ˈbaɪndˌwiːd] nconvolvolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Enormous trees, the trunks of which attained a height of 200 feet, were tied to each other by garlands of bindweed, real natural hammocks, which a light breeze rocked.
BINDWEED Probably the most prevalent of weeds in the average garden is bindweed, a rampant strangler which twirls itself around prize plants and produces funnelshaped white flowers of its own.
| TACKLE bindweed in the borders - remove by digging up every piece of white root or paint on weed killer (you don't want to kill another plant in the process by spraying wildly).
| BINDWEED THIS strangler twirls itself around prize plants and produces funnel-shaped white flowers of its own.
It's similar to bindweed, with its fleshy white underground stems known as rhizomes spreading rapidly.
QWHAT'S the best way to get rid of bindweed? Vera ABINDWEED is a rapidly spreading vine with white trumpet flowers that can be a real pest.
| Tackle bindweed in the borders - remove by digging up every piece of white root or paint on weedkiller (you don't want to kill other plants by spraying wildly).
It will prevent the creeping roots of bindweed and nettles sneaking in from neighbouring gardens.
All are either gone or, if not gone, have been left to fester in the race programme at Newcastle while Class 5 and Class 6 races grew like bindweed in their midst.
"The Ramah Navajo made an infusion of bindweed to treat spider bites; they drank the tea and also rubbed it on the bite.