binghi

binghi

(ˈbɪŋɡɪ)
n
offensive slang Austral an Aboriginal person
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the vitality of reggae music, Rasta music was traditionally Nyahbinghi music, characterized by drumming, chanting, and dancing in a binghi or tabernacle.
The binghi drumming works and vibrates as one with the natural heart beat complemented by chanted words.
Over the years I've been privileged to go to some of their binghi sessions.
Today Nyahbinghi, also called binghi, is a Rastafarian cultural performance that "consists of a complex integration of chanting praises, drumming, reasoning, proper conduct, dancing, clothing, symbolism and devotional discourse" (Yawney 1994, 80).
Tafari: There were more Binghi man in the country than in the town at that time?
From the time Kabinda spoke out at the Binghi in Gouyave in September '79 where the Rasta house for the first time brought up charges against the PRG--from that time, Kabinda's days were numbered.
Veteran artists like Sugar Minott, Frankie Paul, Dawn Penn, Cedrick 'Im' Brooks, Luciano and Beenie Man are joined by up-and-coming artists like Andrew Reid (son of Junior Reid), Boom Viniyard, Binghi Ghost, MasSicker and Joshua Hales.
Several activities have transpired at this historic site in Epworth where Rastas now gather for their binghi, having recognised some natural features and what Carlo Ginzburg (1989) calls "clues, roots of an evidential paradigm", something that convinced the Rastafari community that this was an ideal spiritual place and site for ceremonial gathering.
(International sales: Films Distribution, Paris.) Produced by Hsu Hsiao-ming, Wang Xiaoshuai, Hsu Binghis, Zhang Hao.
In Broome, before heading inland, he finds himself among 'luggers, diving suits, Japanese, Koepangers, Malays, Chinese, Binghis, Manxmen, Scots, Tasmanians, Texans, Englishmen, Bretons, Capetowners, and so many others he thought he was being sent up' (p.
LXXXVII 1901: 1136; and the Home Secretary, who introduced the Bill, explained that some of its provisions were particularly 'designed to meet the case of Binghis employed in swimming diving.' 3 September 1901, QPP Vol.