binocular rivalry


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binocular rivalry

n
(Psychology) psychol the phenomenon whereby one is unable to see simultaneously different images presented one to each eye; usually in some areas of the eye the image presented to the left eye is seen, in others that presented to the right eye. Also called: retinal rivalry
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Prior research led by Robertson has demonstrated that the autistic brain is slower in switching from one image to the next (also known as slower binocular rivalry) due to differences in inhibitory neural transmission in the brain.
The intermediate vision in each eye creates a blend zone (see Figure 4), which allows for binocular summation rather than binocular rivalry that arises with traditional monovision.
The aim is not only to unify the mind and brain sciences under the aegis of PP, but to "fundamentally reconfigure our thinking about the debate between nativism and empiricism, and about the nature and possibility of 'carving nature at its joints.'" The book's scope makes it a nice introduction to a variety of empirically informed explanations of phenomena from binocular rivalry, motor control, natural language parsing, and autism.
Since these neuroplastic effects are reflected through the use of either fusible stimuli, by examining the relative left/right eye contribution to the binocular percept [12, 22, 24], or nonfusible stimuli, by examining the relative left/right eye contributions to binocular rivalry [10,11, 25], it has been argued that the underlying mechanisms may involve inhibitory interactions at a site before binocular combination [26].
Therefore, how to understand the binocular vision perception, for example, binocular rivalry in stereosis [4], is still limited in 3D image quality assessment (3D-IQA).
The third original article [6] is also about the first known application of a neuropsychiatry test in a particular population; the use of the binocular rivalry test to assess cognitive processing in children with schizophrenia.
In order to contribute to the diagnosis of visual attentional disorders, and particularly of ADHD, a test based on binocular rivalry (BR)--a little-used paradigm in the study of this disorder--has been elaborated.
It capitalized on the visual phenomenon of binocular rivalry as a way to test people's metacognition (knowledge about their own mental imagery).
In binocular rivalry studies, two different images are shown to a viewer, one image to each eye.