binomial nomenclature


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binomial nomenclature

n.
The scientific naming of species whereby each species receives a Latin or Latinized name of two parts, the first indicating the genus and the second being the specific epithet. For example, Juglans regia is the English walnut; Juglans nigra, the black walnut.

binomial nomenclature

or

binominal nomenclature

n
(Biology) a system for naming plants and animals by means of two Latin names: the first indicating the genus and the second the species to which the organism belongs, as in Panthera leo (the lion)

bino′mial no′menclature


n.
a naming system in biology in which each species is assigned a unique name consisting of two parts, the name of the genus and another, often descriptive, term.
[1875–80]

binomial nomenclature

The system used in science to name an organism, consisting of two terms, the first being the genus and the second the species. Passer domesticus, the scientific name of the common house sparrow, is an example of binomial nomenclature.
Translations
binomiális nomenklatúrakettős nevezéktan
binomen
binomiale nomenclatuur
References in periodicals archive ?
They struggled for a state where people will have the right to vote irrespective of the binomial nomenclature. HB and the blissful Progressives struggled for a Liberia where everyone would have access to education regardless of their tribe, religion or cultural abrogation.
The Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus is regarded as the father of taxonomy, as he developed a system known as Linnaean taxonomy for categorization of organisms and binomial nomenclature for naming organisms." So there we have it, and this description relating to biological organisms is precisely why I hate the use of the word taxonomy in a business context.
Also of note will be volumes from Selby Gardens' complete set of Curtis's Botanical Magazine, dating to 1787, and early editions of the work of Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus, who developed the system of binomial nomenclature by which all living organisms are now named.
Species Plantarum contains page upon page of examples of the binomial nomenclature that enables a universal language for the classification and accurate description of plants.