binomial

(redirected from binomially)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

bi·no·mi·al

 (bī-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Consisting of or relating to two names or terms.
n.
1. Mathematics A polynomial with two terms.
2. Biology A taxonomic name in binomial nomenclature.

[From New Latin binōmius, having two names : bi- + French nom, name (from Latin nōmen; see nominal).]

bi·no′mi·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

binomial

(baɪˈnəʊmɪəl)
n
1. (Mathematics) a mathematical expression consisting of two terms, such as 3x + 2y
2. (Biology) a two-part taxonomic name for an animal or plant. See binomial nomenclature
adj
(Mathematics) referring to two names or terms
[C16: from Medieval Latin binōmius from bi-1 + Latin nōmen name]
biˈnomially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bi•no•mi•al

(baɪˈnoʊ mi əl)

n.
1. an algebraic expression that is a sum or difference of two terms, as 3x + 2y and x 2− 4 x.
2. a taxonomic name consisting of a generic and a specific term, used to designate species.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to a term, expression, or quantity that has two parts.
[1550–60; < Late Latin binōmi(us) having two names]
bi•no′mi•al•ism, n.
bi•no′mi•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō′mē-əl)
A mathematical expression having two terms, such as 3a + 2b.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

binomial

a name composed of two terms, a generic and a specific. — binomial, adj.
See also: Classification
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.binomial - (mathematics) a quantity expressed as a sum or difference of two terms; a polynomial with two terms
quantity - the concept that something has a magnitude and can be represented in mathematical expressions by a constant or a variable
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
Adj.1.binomial - of or relating to or consisting of two terms; "binomial expression"
2.binomial - having or characterized by two names, especially those of genus and species in taxonomies; "binomial nomenclature of bacteria"
onymous - bearing a name; "articles in magazines are usually onymous"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
binomikaksiosainentieteellinen nimi
binom
binomiobinomiale
binom

binomial

[baɪˈnəʊmɪəl]
A. ADJde dos términos
B. Nbinomio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

binomial

[baɪˈnəʊmɪəl] (Math)
1. adjbinomio/a
2. nbinomiale f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming that the asset returns of the obligors are multivariate normally distributed (with correlation parameter p) and are driven by a common factor M, this leads to a portfolio loss S that is binomially distributed conditionally on the state of the common factor, that is,
The numbers of individuals recaptured in a stratum, [m.sub.ij], were assumed to be binomially distributed by the number of marked individuals released upstream of the RST within the stratum, [n.sub.ij], and the probability that an individual passing the RST was captured, [p.sub.ij]:
Binomially distributed data were analysed using the chi-square test and presented as frequency distribution with absolute numbers and relative distribution in percent.
Given S(t - 1), the number of newly infected individuals i(t) at day t is binomially distributed with parameters (S(t-1) and p(t)).
Assuming that the number of successes is binomially distributed, this study had a one-sided alpha of 0.05 and a power of 0.92 for detecting a true clinical benefit rate of at least 20% versus the null hypothesis of 5% or less.
Detection probability (P) was assumed to be binomially distributed and estimated using the repeated counts within a continuous section of habitat.
All the experimental results are seen to lie within a two standard deviation interval of the theoretical results, confirming that knock events are indeed binomially distributed.
We measured the dependent variable binomially (reduction or no reduction) based on the radiological outcome.
If we have independent observations, with the [i.sup.th] observation treated as a representation of a binomially distributed random variable yt with probability g and the logit of the underlying probability g is a linear function of the predictors x, the systematic structure of the model can be defined as: