biocomputing

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bi·o·com·put·ing

 (bī′ō-kŏm-pyo͞o′tĭng)
n.
1. The use of cells or biological molecules such as DNA to perform the functions of an electronic computer. Also called biological computing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biocomputing

(ˌbaɪəʊˌkəmˈpjuːtɪŋ)
n
the application of computing to problems in biology, biochemistry, and genetics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
J., Programming and Metaprogramming in the Human Biocomputer, Crown Publishing Group, 1987.
Needling 4 Gates for a simple food allergy (or 4 Gates + both Heart 7s in an emotional NAET treatment) resets the body's biocomputer to allow the correct message to enter and reset the body's homeostatic processes.
But in the case of the biocomputer, the city is a chip measuring about 1.5 cm square in which channels have been etched.
For Ong, language is not a kind of technology, but rather the expressive system conveyed through technologies--whether drum, pen, printing press, digitization, quantum computer, or biocomputer.
Such biocomputer may be more suited for cognitive sensing that is closest replication of human senses.
Acquisitions include LION bioscience's purchase of Trega Biosciences (see IBO 1/31/01), Orchid Biocomputer's purchase of GeneScreen, and Incyte's acquisition of Proteome.
caliper.com), Aclara (www.aclara.com), and Orchid BioComputer (www.
Recent leases include Orchid Biocomputer's lease of an additional 10,000 square feet of space at 307 College Road East, for which J.
Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA; 408-731-5000) and Orchid Biocomputer, Inc.
"There's a clear need to do thousands--if not tens of thousands--of genes at one time," says Paul Heaney, senior director of new technology and applications at Orchid Biocomputer in Princeton, N.J.