bioethics

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bi·o·eth·ics

 (bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

(ˌbaɪəʊˈɛθɪks)
n
(Philosophy) (functioning as singular) the study of ethical problems arising from biological research and its applications in such fields as organ transplantation, genetic engineering, or artificial insemination
ˌbioˈethical adj
bioethicist n

bi•o•eth•ics

(ˌbaɪ oʊˈɛθ ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a field of study and counsel concerned with the implications of certain medical procedures, genetic engineering, and care of the terminally ill.
[1970–75]
bi`o•eth′i•cal, adj.
bi`o•eth′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
The study of the ethics surrounding medical research and health-care practices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bioethics - the branch of ethics that studies moral values in the biomedical sciencesbioethics - the branch of ethics that studies moral values in the biomedical sciences
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
neuroethics - the study of ethical implications of treatments for neurological diseases
Translations

bioethics

n bioética
References in periodicals archive ?
This book contains 15 chapters for medical practitioners by practicing medical professionals, theologians, bioethicists, and philosophers from the US, Italy, and Australia, who address critical issues they encounter in medical practice and Catholic responses to them.
This happened because bioethicists have rationalized its philosophical basis in ethics.
How do we make medical moral judgments as practising bioethicists? Do we simply follow the prescriptions of law and professional codes of practice; do we start with the best available medical knowledge and act accordingly; or do we ask in the light of law and science what is the right thing to do?
Thousands of medical ethicists and bioethicists, as they are called, professionally guide the unthinkable on its passage through the debatable on its way to becoming the justifiable until it is finally established as the unexceptionable.
In an public letter posted online on Friday, around 150 leading public health experts, many of them bioethicists, said the risk of infection from the Zika virus is too high for the Games to go ahead safely.
Witnesses included scientists, bioethicists, and legal scholars.
The agency hosted a workshop of researchers and bioethicists from around the country recently to consider issuing new guidelines about the research.
Some bioethicists believe that such prebirth testing is wrong, arguing that the information could stigmatize kids or lead parents to terminate pregnancies of genetically at-risk fetuses.
(http://www.npr.org/2008/01/23/18299098/should-we-accept-steroid-use-in-sports) In a 2008 debate over the acceptance of steroid use in sports hosted by the series Intelligence Squared U.S., several bioethicists argued in favor of loosening performance-enhancing drug restrictions on various grounds: sport itself is dangerous and is not banned; the whole concept of preventing adults from using drugs is paternalistic; and the perennial "everyone is already doing it" argument.
Not all bioethicists would necessarily cleave to this purpose but it would be a central pillar around which to organize bioethical variety, i.e., this (inter)discipline, second order phenomena, topic and profession or service.
We need to bring diverse groups together including physicians, bioethicists, clergy and ordinary citizens for an open dialogue.
Editors' and publishers' slow, sometimes absent response to flawed studies dismays bioethicists. Retracted studies continue to be cited in medical studies, partly because publishers do not always make it clear that a study has been withdrawn.