biographee

bi·og·ra·phee

 (bī-ŏg′rə-fē′)
n.
The subject of a biography.

biographee

(ˌbaɪɒɡræˈfiː)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person whose biography has been written
Translations

biographee

[baɪˌɒgrəˈfiː] Nbiografiado/a m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
Marquis Who's Who has announced it has recognized Debra Bartz, MS, AADP, as a distinguished biographee for her excellence in aviation, the company said.
Mendelsohn is among the first to receive this award celebrating his professional accomplishments and longevity as a Marquis biographee since the early 1990s.
"Many people refused to speak with me because they were scared of upsetting the biographee," author Diego Enrique Osorno told the British paper. 
It is the way of knowing the biographee, study his work because, after all, it is the only place the person is in".
(1) To the contrary, the phrase occurs first in Carpenter's standard biography of Tolkien, apparently moving over time from biographer to biographee: Anders Stenstrom is likely right in his theory that the phrase is the result of Carpenter splicing snippets from Tolkien's letters ("A Mythology?" 310-11).
Some information is appealing only to an audience interested in the biographee.
Not the Jacobin English philosopher Bacon, but the modern British painter Bacon (1909-92) is international literature and art critic Peppiatt's biographee. The first edition appeared shortly after the artist's death, but it leaned heavily on interviews and conversations with Bacon himself because not much other information was yet available, especially about the less public, and perhaps less savory, aspects of his life.
Entries in Who's Who are retained for the life of the biographee, with the listing transferred upon his or her death to Who Was Who.
One of the bizarreries of the world of publishing seems to be that if it is your ambition to perpetrate biography your chances of actually seeing it in print increase in ratio to the number of biographies of your selected biographee already crowding the bookshelves.
Vanity publications Librarians must distinguish reputable and authoritative biographical dictionaries, in which the treatments can be trusted to be accurate and thorough, from so-called "vanity publications." Inclusion in the latter is typically contingent on the submission of data by the biographee together with prepayment for a copy of the volume.
As he reflects on his experiences with editors, publishers, interview subjects, and Sontag herself, Rollyson demonstrates how high the stakes can be in the genre of biography, especially when the biographee is a well-connected author accustomed to controlling her own literary reputation and public image.