biomarker


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bi·o·mark·er

 (bī′ō-mär′kər)
n.
1. Medicine
a. A physiological substance, such as human chorionic gonadotropin or alpha-fetoprotein, that when present in abnormal amounts in the serum may indicate the presence of disease, as that caused by a malignancy.
b. A specific physical trait used to measure or indicate the effects or progress of a disease or condition: Biomarkers of aging include thinning of the hair. Also called biosignature.
2. See biosignature.

biomarker

(ˈbaɪəʊˌmɑːkə)
n
1. (Medicine) another name for biological marker
2. (Psychology) another name for biological marker
References in periodicals archive ?
The large share of this segment is mainly attributed to the tremendous potential of protein biomarkers in cancer detection, diagnostics, prognostics, and clinical and therapeutic applications; and low cost of the protein biomarker tests as compared to genetic biomarker tests.
A comprehensive discussion of the significance of each biomarker like pharmacodynamics and toxic dynamics of protein biomarkers, analytical biomarkers, and epigenetic biomarkers is going to be held in this biomarkers congress.
The summit will address the latest developments in the biomarker arena from discovery to translation to commercialization.
Biomarkers of Brain Injury and Neurological Disorders
A biomarker is a pharmacological or physiological measurement that is used to predict a toxic event; a specific molecule in the body, which has a particular feature that makes it instrumental for measuring disease progression or the effects of treatment.
Biomarker markets are estimated from 2013 to 2023 according to share of markets for various technologies and applications: proteomics, metabolomics, molecular diagnostics, drug discovery, clinical trials, and bioinformatics.
WuXi offers clinical biomarker services in anatomic pathology, hematology, genomics, and soluble biomarkers focusing on oncology and infectious diseases.
A biomarker of plaque rupture would show an increasing concentration when a (coronary) atherosclerotic plaque ruptures.
The chapter ends with a discussion of the imaging roadmap and Biomarker Consortium (Foundation for the National Institutes of Health); this is a sudden shift from the prior sections in the chapter.
What is probably more important is the conceptual framework through which we should interpret biomarker research.
Louis, has initiated a collaboration with leading researchers at University of Glasgow to discover novel epigenetic biomarkers for the development of tests that screen for cancer at an early stage and provide personalized information about how tumors are most effectively treated.
This requires detailed exposure assessment for which cross-sectional biomarker studies are useful.