bioprinting


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bioprinting

n
the construction of replacement body parts using techniques developed for three-dimensional printing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In five to 10 years, the surgeon and researcher sees the technology of 3D bioprinting booming and going commercial.
Specific topics include nanofibrous scaffolds for the regeneration of bone tissue, biomaterials and designs supporting cartilage regeneration, biomaterials and nanotechnology for tissue engineering: neural regeneration, progress in tissue engineering approaches toward hepatic diseases therapeutics, and laser-assisted bioprinting for tissue engineering.
* FRANCE: L'Oreal and biotech firm Poietis, Pessac, France, have inked a multiyear accord related to bioprinting a hair follicle that could lead to the creation of a functional follicle that is capable of producing hair.
The two-day conference will focus on stem cell therapy, bioprinting, disease modeling and regulatory challenges facing stem cell technology applications.
At present, 3D bioprinting is applicable and shows great potential in tissue engineering.
"But we are working on the next stage - 3D bioprinting - which is printing living tissues, living structures."
Bioprinting and 3-D printing of pharmaceuticals could be the next steps.
Bioprinting has the advantage of high throughput, digital control and highly accurate control for achievement of the above mentioned goals.
ISLAMABAD -- Scientists have developed a new bioprinting method that can create intricately patterned 3-D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and tiny blood vessels.
Gartner predicts that the technology of 3D 'bioprinting' (the medical application of 3D printing to produce living tissue and organs) is advancing so quickly that it will spark a major ethical debate on its use by 2016.
Andras Forgacs from Modern Meadow also spoke about the value of tissue engineering techniques based on bioprinting, the 3D assembly of tissues driven by computer-controlled processes.
After an introduction describing modern regenerative medicine from a historical perspective and taking a look at the divergence between theoretical predictions of the past and present practice, the first part of the book delves into the fundamentals: tissue engineering; stem biology; the technologies of stem sheets, bioprinting, synthetic materials; questions of cell and tissue guidance and biocompatibility.