bioregionalism


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bi·o·re·gion·al·ism

 (bī′ō-rē′jə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The belief that social organization and environmental policies should be based on bioregions rather than on arbitrary political boundaries.

bi′o·re′gion·al·ist n.

bioregionalism

(ˈbaɪəʊˌriːdʒənəlɪzəm)
n
the conviction that environmental and social policies should be determined by the bioregion rather than economics or politics
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on Catholic social teaching, you'll study environmental politics, bioregionalism, environmental ethics, as well as international law.
"Toward a Cosmopolitan Bioregionalism." Bioregionalism.
Author of several books on bioregionalism, Sale believes that the current industrial-technological system, based on transport of goods over vast distances, is unsustainable and will collapse.
Bioregionalism, as stated above, is a view of the world defined not by political borders but by ecological borders between distinct ecosystems or "bioregions." Bioregionalism suggests a shared identity among people who live in the same ecosystem.
Explore permaculture, bioregionalism. intentional communities.
- David Haenke, "Bioregionalism and Ecological Economics"
Beginning with the decentring of the human subject, bioregionalism involves a sensual re-inhabitation of the world based on full immersion and dialogue with place.
Also, "the concept of bioregionalism" was hot conceived in the United States in the 1960s (p.
(1990) Searching for Common Ground: Ecofeminism and Bioregionalism. In I.
There is also a growing commitment from donors to "bioregionalism," the notion that ecological management must be defined by natural delineations such as watersheds and biomes rather than by national or other borders.
Water advocate that supports technology, bioregionalism, composting toilets, dowsing, ecology, flow forms, stream