biosocial


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bi·o·so·cial

 (bī′ō-sō′shəl)
adj.
Of or having to do with the interaction of biological and social characteristics: the biosocial aspects of disease.

bi′o·so′cial·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biosocial

(ˌbaɪəʊˈsəʊʃəl)
adj
relating to the interaction of biological and social elements
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bi•o•so•cial

(ˌbaɪ oʊˈsoʊ ʃəl)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or entailing the interaction or combination of social and biological factors.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Cal Samra is known for his work as lay executive director of the Huxley Institute for Biosocial Research as well as editor of the "Joyful Noise Letters," a publication providing jokes and anecdotes to pastors to use in their sermons or church publications to introduce light-hearted humor emphasizing the healing power of laughter.
Contributors in anthropology, medicine, health policy, and public health explore cancer as a set of biosocial phenomena and present international case studies.
As I describe below, many aspects of the local experiences of Agent Orange and dioxin slipped through biosocial framework.
Our aim was to measure the prevalence of stress and analyze its association with biosocial characteristics and coping strategies relative to the work process for mental healthcare providers at CAPS in a city in the interior of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
The following chapter by Catherine Connor-Swietlicki utilizes the Quixote as evidence for autopoiesis's claim that psychological development depends upon biosocial interactions.
The biosocial medicine models are not enough to understand the complex social articulation involving diverse actors enrolled in specific fields of sociability (the state, the market, the family networks, the fields of sociability inscribed in strong bonds, but not necessarily from the family network ...).
Apart from that special focus should be emphasized among different biosocial groups through combined and coordinated primordial and primary prevention strategies.
BMAC's biosocial peace approach to conservation, which is interdisciplinary and highly inclusive of local populations, may be a critical model to follow for future primate conservation endeavors.
In 2015, Arizona State University and the Santa Fe Institute launched the ASU-SFI Center for Biosocial Complex Systems to advance understanding of problems that stretch across complex systems.
Assessment of family biosocial factors should be part of the reason for encounter during consultation to unravel family variables that positively or negatively influence depression.