biostatistical


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biostatistical

(ˌbaɪəʊstəˈtɪstɪkəl)
adj
relating to biostatistics
References in periodicals archive ?
The alliance will offer regional and local project management, certified bioanalysis, trial monitoring, data management and biostatistical services, analytical platforms of mass spectrometry and immunoassay for small and large molecules, sample storage and stability testing, and development of new methods and diagnostic tests.
Whether it is phase I or generic programs or larger phase II and III studies, Quartesian can offer the industrys leading data capture system combined with our low-cost EDC build, data management and biostatistical programming," said Stephen Boccardo, Quartesians senior vice president of business development and commercial strategy.
WVCTSI structure includes 8 cores (Figure 3) providing a broad range of services that include funding for pilot projects, establishment of a statewide specimen bank, and research design, epidemiology and biostatistical expertise.
It provided a great opportunity to highlight biostatistical techniques through an extremely relevant and important application," Sullivan said.
Essentials of a Successful Biostatistical Collaboration
She was the director of the Methodological and Biostatistical Coordinating Center for the rhIGF-1 Genentech Epidemiological Project.
I can say 2 things about the biostatistical methods I learned in college for the analysis of markers and diagnostic tests.
When I told them I was prepared to study in my own time I was given a job as a Biostatistical Programming Manager.
Clinical Technologies: Providing randomization and trial supply management technology, electronic Clinical Outcome Assessments (eCOA), patient alerts and reminders, data integration and biostatistical consulting services.
dialogues with philosophers by discussing multiple definitions of health and illness: from the biostatistical theory proposed by Christopher Boorse "in which health is the absence of disease and diseases are states that interfere with species-typical natural functions" (xiv; see also 6-10) to holistic theories of health and to approaches that assign conceptual priority to illness instead of health; from S.
Julia Lin who is stepping down after serving as one of our three Biostatistical Editors over the last two years.
He covers disease causality, epidemiologic measures, random and systematic error in studies of casual factors, the infectious disease process, outbreak investigation, screening for disease, and advanced biostatistical and epidemiologic techniques, such as survival analysis, Mantel-Haenszel techniques, and tests for interaction.