biosystematics


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bi·o·sys·tem·at·ics

 (bī′ō-sĭs′tə-măt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The statistical analysis of data obtained from genetic, biochemical, and other studies to assess the taxonomic relationships of organisms or populations, especially within an evolutionary framework.

bi′o·sys′tem·at′ic adj.

biosystematics

(ˌbaɪəʊˌsɪstɪˈmætɪks)
n
(Biology) (functioning as singular) the study of the variation and evolution of a population of organisms in relation to their taxonomic classification

biosystematics

biosystematy. — biosystematic, biosystematical, adj.
See also: Classification
biosystematy. — biosystematic, biosystematical, adj.
See also: Names
the science of the classification of living things. — biosystematic, biosystematical, adj.
See also: Biology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biosystematics - use of data (e.g. cytogenetic or biochemical) to assess taxonomic relations especially within an evolutionary framework
systematics - the science of systematic classification
References in periodicals archive ?
Biosystematics of the Oryza AA genome wild taxa (Oryza sativa complex) by morpho-physiological traits, isozyme and RFLPs.
The biosystematics of Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus sensu lato in relation to Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis.
ultimum Trow (1), which was morphologically identified as such at the Biosystematics Centre in Ottawa by D.J.S.
Biosystematics of the genus Trirhabda LeConte of America north of Mexico (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera).
Dr Rueda is an Adjunct Scientist of the Smithsonian Institution and former Research Entomologist and Chief of the Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit, Entomology Branch, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, located at the Smithsonian Institution, Museum Support Center, Suitland, Maryland.
Plant taxonomy and biosystematics. Edward Arnold publisher Ltd, London.
Biosystematics of the genus Nousia from Southern South America (Ephemeroptera: Leptophlebiidae: Atalophlebiinae).
Biosystematics and hosts of the Triatoma protracta complex in North America (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) (Rodentia: Cricetidae).
Part of this work was carried out in the Center for Biosystematics and Biodiversity at Texas A&M University, a facility funded, in part, by the National Science Foundation (award DIR-8907006).
Allozyme differentiation and biosystematics of the Californian closed cone pines (Pinus subsect.
In addition, 8 interactive computerized identification keys (LUCID software (16)) of selected African and Asian sand fly species (potential or known vectors), based on specimens from different depositories are presently posted on the Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit (WRBU) website (wrbu.si.edu).