bioterrorism

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bi·o·ter·ror·ism

 (bī′ō-tĕr′ə-rĭz′əm)
n.
The use of biological agents, such as pathogenic organisms or agricultural pests, for terrorist purposes.

bi′o·ter′ror·ist adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bioterrorism - terrorism using the weapons of biological warfarebioterrorism - terrorism using the weapons of biological warfare
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

bioterrorism

[ˌbaɪəʊˈterərɪzəm] Nbioterrorismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bioterrorism

bio-terrorism [ˌbaɪəʊˈtɛrərɪzəm] nbioterrorisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bi·o·ter·ror·ism

n. terrorismo biológico, bioterrorismo. V.: Appendix C
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bioterrorism

n bioterrorismo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has become both a food safety and a homeland security concern because bioterrorists could, using the natural toxins that cause botulism, make products and beverages deadly.
But botulism has also become a homeland security focus, because bioterrorists could use the toxins that cause botulism to make everyday foods and beverages deadly.
Developing a network of credible countermeasures requires a consistent demonstration of intent to defeat bioterrorists backed by a viable capability.
The fear: Would-be bioterrorists may be combing the pages of technical publications for tips on how to wreak havoc.
Human diseases aren't the only possible downside to insect-based biowarfare: The economic impact of crop-destroying pests successfully deployed by bioterrorists could easily measure in the billions of dollars.
* facilitate identification of and retribution against the bioterrorists.
It also contains detailed information on Anthrax, Smallpox and other potentially lethal diseases that may be released into the population by bioterrorists. Physicians input specific details of the patient exam.
If the family back in Europe continues to make their own chocolate at home and then sends it by international mail, all clear; presumably there is no danger of bioterrorists sneaking into the kitchen.
No, it isn't anthrax or smallpox or bubonic plague or some other deadly germ brewed by bioterrorists. It's a new push, instigated by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), to toughen state emergency health powers" laws to enable governors, in conjunction with federal authorities, to exercise police-state powers in the event of another episode of bioterrorism, or even a natural epidemic.
Do we care more about blundering bioterrorists than the mass destruction that HIV continues to wreak upon us?
Bioterrorists don't need rare pathogens like smallpox or glanders to inflict misery.