biparental


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Related to biparental: biparental inheritance

bi·pa·ren·tal

 (bī′pə-rĕn′tl)
adj.
Of or derived from two parents: biparental inheritance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biparental

(ˌbaɪpəˈrɛntəl)
adj
from two parents
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical use of monopronucleated zygotes following blastocyst culture and preimplantation genetic screening, including verification of biparental chromosome inheritance.
Yasue and Dearden (2006) reported the simultaneous biparental incubation of two nests by a pair of Malaysian Plovers Charadrius peronii.
If near neighbor mating continues to be the norm in this species, and the number of possible mates is kept low due to habitat restriction or deterioration, this may eventually lead to an increase in biparental inbreeding and structure in these populations (Hamrick & Loveless, 1987).
Can facultative parthenogenesis occur in biparental mealybug species?
En este contexto, Palacios y Rodrigo (2001) proponen la de-construccion del concepto tradicional de la familia nuclear biparental, dado que actualmente existen muchos arreglos distintos de esta idea estereotipada: no necesariamente estan presentes ambos padres, las uniones pueden disolverse a traves del divorcio y la separacion, los hijos pueden ser adoptivos y/o no tener vinculos biologicos con los padres que los educan, las parejas pueden ser formadas por personas del mismo sexo, la distribucion de los roles por genero es mucho menos rigida.
DNA genotyping, as Ronnett explains, can precisely classify androgenetic complete mole, diandric triploid partial mole, and biparental nonmolar cases.
Development of a male sterile eggplant by utilizing the cytoplasm of Solanum virginianum and a biparental transmission of chloroplast DNA in backcrossing.
These species reproduce on small vertebrate carcasses, which serve as the sole source of food for both parents and offspring for the duration of the reproductive bout, during which parents provide facultative biparental care [19] and cull the brood through filial cannibalism [20-22] to produce a positive correlation between carcass size and offspring number [20, 21, 23, 24].