birdcall


Also found in: Thesaurus.

bird·call

 (bûrd′kôl′)
n.
1. The song or cry of a bird.
2.
a. An imitation of the song or cry of a bird.
b. A small device for producing this sound.

birdcall

n
1. the characteristic call or song of a bird
2. an imitation of this
3. (Hunting) an instrument imitating the call of a bird, used esp by hunters or bird-catchers
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.birdcall - the characteristic sound produced by a birdbirdcall - the characteristic sound produced by a bird; "a bird will not learn its song unless it hears it at an early age"
animal communication - communication between animals (of the same species)
bell-like call - a birdcall that resembles the tone of a bell
two-note call - a birdcall having two notes; "the two-note call of the cuckoo"
2.birdcall - a device for imitating a birdcall
acoustic device - a device for amplifying or transmitting sound
References in periodicals archive ?
One day at Gran's they hear a birdcall that is unfamiliar to both of them.
In the wake of Park Burger's success, Failyau and Newlin have started two other Denver fast casual chains: Homegrown Tap & Dough in 2014 and Birdcall in 2017.
The five senses communed well with the environment through various activities (watching, touching, and listening to nature, natural view, birdcall, sounds of a valley, the sound of bugs, fragrance of forest, clean and fresh air, and warmth of the sunlight.
Tyler knows every birdcall around, and Lillian can tell you the best swimming holes along the Schoharie.
As a keen fisherman and wildlife enthusiast I've always taken every opportunity to explore the wildlife around me, and when fishing I always make a mental note of every birdcall I hear and study the surrounding bankside habitat with keen interest.
Parallel also to her death is a specific birdcall that occurs after Mohammad's drowning.
I found no tear of hair or jacket scrap; I heard no ominous birdcall. That was the finding.
Bagot also suggested that the 'accompanying noises made by the singers imitate the sounds made by ducks when settling on lagoons, or rising from them'; whereas Spencer claimed that the birdcall noises imitated those of 'plovers'.
By far the longest movement in performance, it begins with a slow, lyrical melody featuring clarinet, horn, and strings; the second section begins with a birdcall-like unaccompanied oboe phrase in alternation with a new lyrical melody in the strings; the birdcall gradually permeates the full orchestral texture, including the bass instruments, and eventually the first melody returns in counterpoint with the birdcall figure.
The sound is a hypnotic cascade of notes which invokes the sounds suggested by the title ie bells (Clychau from the Welsh) and the West African birdcall of the Dibon ( a relative of the hornbill).