birth family


Also found in: Medical, Acronyms.

birth family

n.
A family consisting of one's biological parents and siblings as opposed to adoptive ones.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adoptive parents often simply need reassurance that any wish to seek out birth family members is perfectly anatural and the urge to do so is about the need to complete a sense of identity - the missing piece of the jigsaw for adopted adults.
He spent 15 years hunting for his birth family - only to discover his mum had died before they could meet.
The second important lesson of my career I learned the first time I had to separate children from their birth family. To this day, I remember their names, the street address and their reactions.
Chung's exploration of identity and adoption becomes even more complicated when her initial contact with her birth family coincides with her first pregnancy.
For the first nine years of her life, Rebecca thought her adoptive family was her birth family. One evening she found her adoption papers by accident.
Professor Featherstone, who is Professor of Social Work at the University of Huddersfield, and her team interviewed large numbers of social workers, birth family members, adoptive parents and adopted people plus lawyers and other professionals to compile their 44-page report.
Though his life is wonderful and he is loved, Saroo's memories of his life back in India lead him to begin searching for his birth family in secret.
"Your actions in killing Elsie have devastated three families - the birth family of Elsie, the family you had sought to build with Craig Scully-Hicks and your own birth family.
THE birth family of Elsie Scully-Hicks have said she would "still be alive today" if she had not been removed from their care by social services.
THE birth family of murdered toddler Elsie Scully-Hicks have said she would "still be alive today" if she had not been removed from their care by social services.