birth parent


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birth parent

also birth·par·ent (bûrth′pâr′ənt, -păr′-)
n.
One's biological parent.

birth′ par`ent


n.
a parent who has conceived or sired rather than adopted a child and whose genes are therefore transmitted to the child. Also called biological parent.
[1980–85]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
If the birth parent is the applicant the adopted child does not have to undergo counselling (Mullender 1991:133).
Children might need to adjust to the loss of a relationship with a birth parent or sibling while getting to know new stepfamily members.
7) Another commonly cited justification is that secrecy protects the feelings of the infertile birth parent (usually the man) because, as one commentator noted, "[o]ur society has unfortunately equated virility with fertility in men.
One of her most useful chapters, on Search and Reunion, gives 17 pointers on how to conduct a search for a birth parent.
More and more states are moving, as Michigan did this summer, to allow a birth parent or an adoptee to make a request through the local court for birth records.
An inattentive or unaware birth parent therefore has less opportunity to obstruct or upset an adoption.
Many oppose such actions because they fear they will lose their child to the birth parent.
Tenders are invited for Adoption Counts - Birth Parent Support Services
According to this view, an adoption is "semiopen" if the principals do not share last names and addresses and communicate instead though an agency or facilitator, or if the adopted child does not know of or participate in contact with the birth parent.
The novel provides a twist on the birth parent search.
Also, friends/relatives will ask about the new parents' children, but the question will invariably be asked of the birth parent, not the "new" parent, who has to sit there, knowing he/she is equally contributing to the children's lives, but feels unappreciated.