bisectional


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bi·sect

 (bī′sĕkt′, bī-sĕkt′)
v. bi·sect·ed, bi·sect·ing, bi·sects
v.tr.
To cut or divide into two parts, especially two equal parts.
v.intr.
To split; fork.

bi·sec′tion n.
bi·sec′tion·al adj.
bi·sec′tion·al·ly adv.

bisectional

(ˌbaɪˈsɛkʃənəl)
adj
relating to division into two equal parts
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bisectional - of or relating to bisectionbisectional - of or relating to bisection    
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thyroid primodium is originally formed as an empty tube however tissue and flesh gradually develop in it and when fully grown the organ takes a bisectional structure that is joined together by a tissue called isthmus.
Recently, a software-only algorithm (bisectional coordination protocol) was presented in [48] to reduce the shared memory dependences.
Moreover, the bisectional search algorithm developed in [46] can be used to derive the [epsilon]-bound.
(167) This so-called balance rule "protected Northerners against the dominance of national policymaking by the South, and it protected Southerners against the antislavery initiatives of the North." (168) In other words, it enabled Congress--in a bipartisan and bisectional manner--to lock in the national status quo on the slavery question.
In the higher dimensional case, the Frankel conjecture claims that a compact Kahler manifold with positive bisectional curvature is the projective space.
Support for disruptive networking technologies: Supports technologies required for bisectional bandwidth scaling such as MLAG, SPB, TRILL, data center bridging, at data centers and interconnects.
Sectional approach; this approach is based on the bisectional economic thought (core and margin sections).
Over time, they have invented, and have come to accept as legitimate, an increasing range of mechanisms for extra-textual constitutional change ranging from bisectional compromises to landmark statutes to judicial review.