biseriate


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bi·se·ri·ate

 (bī-sēr′ē-ĭt, -āt′)
adj.
Arranged in two rows.

biseriate

(ˌbaɪˈsɪərɪɪt)
adj
(Botany) (of plant parts, such as petals) arranged in two whorls, cycles, rows, or series
References in periodicals archive ?
In affinity with Passiflora pardifolia Vanderplank, differs mainly in possessing variegated leaves with adaxial white--reddish strips, flowers with white-green biseriate corona, ovoid oblong ripe fruit with the lower end acute.
Conidial heads biseriate, Phialides 5-8.0 [micro]m borne on metulae 4.5-7.5 [micro]m (Table 2).
0.07 mm) is composed of a single inner layer of encircling fibers, surrounded by a uni- to biseriate layer of slightly anticlinally elongate sclereids (Fig.
nov., a biseriate black Aspergillus species with world-wide distribution.
Ascospores ovoid with rounded ends and 1 submedian septum, constricted at the septum, grayish brown to pale brown, biseriate, arranged in a helix, 58-88 x 15-28 [my]m; hyaline appendices at both ends, small, semicircular.
Conidial heads were short columnar and biseriate with the phialides borne on brown, septate metulae.
Fruiting bodies (conidiophores) were visible, including the stalk (variably present), central vesicle with circumferentially biseriate, radiating linear metulae and phialides, and peripheral round, pigmented conidia (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)) and Grocott's methenamine silver stain rarely demonstrated septae.
5 pairs, contiguous, small, opposite bracts dorsally not overlapping, distal margins of bracts with a few broken teeth, bract cells [+ or -] similar to leaf cells; antheridia 1 per bract, antheridial stalk biseriate. Gynoecia and sporophytes not seen.
The vesicles were globose upon maturity with heads, 20.0-45.0 m in diameter, and have both uniseriate and biseriate
Subgenital plate far exceeding pygofer side, A-group setae absent, B-group setae rigid, C-group setae in single row, sometimes biseriate at basal fourth and near middle, reaching apex of plate, D-group setae numerous, elongate (Figs.