bit player


Also found in: Idioms, Wikipedia.

bit′ play`er


n.
an actor having a small speaking part.
[1935–40]
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet 12 months on he was almost an afterthought in the build-up, something of a bit player in all the hoopla surrounding the Cheltenham Gold Cup rematch between Native River and Might Bite.
Grande also says she was a bit player in several movies when she was younger.
"Heil myself," he ad-libs, a bit player stealing the spotlight from the egomaniacal star.
But actually my first appearance was in Regal Films' 'Relasyon,' as a bit player. So, I got excited when Mother Lily told me that she wanted me to do a film with Regal soon.
He began life, for the author, as a "bit player" in Mr.
He was a bit player at Easter Road but the 23-year-old has emerged as a key member of Tommy Wright's team - pulling the strings and handling free-kicks and corners.
Cast as a bit player in a brief piece of "gotcha" audio, she became human, complicated and important.
The natural ego of all three wouldn't allow any to become a bit player so whether Alan Pardew went 4-3-3, 4-4-2 or 4-5-1, the simple equation is that four into three doesn't go with Cisse, Ba, Ben Arfa, and Carroll.
A close friend of Patel's also defended him in a brief interview at his home, saying Patel was not trying to defraud anyone; he was just an unwitting, bit player in a larger scheme.
THIS WIDE-RANGING collection of essays focuses on the political economy of New Brunswick and the problems the province faces in seeking a degree of self-determination and ability to guarantee employment over the long run in the context of an increasingly globalized economy in which New Brunswick is a bit player. Mark J.
McHale has unearthed a trove of new information about the film, including letters from Ford's secretary giving authentic information and commentary about events behind the scenes on location in Ireland; a memoir in which a surviving bit player describes her experiences on set with John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, and John Ford; an examination of Richard Llewellyn's initial rejected screenplay; and a chapter about the many theatrical, dramatic, television and musical representations of The Quiet Man over the last fifty years.
That insight was appreciated but the back-story of a bit player did not concern readers at the time.