bite the dust


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bite

 (bīt)
v. bit (bĭt), bit·ten (bĭt′n) or bit, bit·ing, bites
v.tr.
1. To cut, grip, or tear with or as if with the teeth.
2.
a. To pierce the skin of with the teeth, fangs, or mouthparts.
b. To sting with a stinger.
3. To cut into with or as if with a sharp instrument: The axe bit the log deeply.
4. To grip, grab, or seize: bald treads that couldn't bite the icy road; bitten by a sudden desire to travel.
5. To eat into; corrode.
6. To cause to sting or be painful: cold that bites the skin; a conscience bitten by remorse.
v.intr.
1. To grip, cut into, or injure something with or as if with the teeth.
2. To have a stinging effect.
3. To have a sharp taste.
4. To take or swallow bait.
5. To be taken in by a ploy or deception: tried to sell the Brooklyn Bridge, but no one bit.
6. Vulgar Slang To be highly disagreeable or annoying.
n.
1. The act of biting.
2. A skin wound or puncture produced by an animal's teeth or mouthparts: the bite of an insect.
3.
a. A stinging or smarting sensation.
b. An incisive, penetrating quality: the bite of satire.
4. An amount removed by or as if by an act of biting: Rezoning took a bite out of the town's residential area.
5. An excerpt or fragment taken from something larger, such as a film.
6.
a. An amount of food taken into the mouth at one time; a mouthful.
b. Informal A light meal or snack.
7. The act or an instance of taking bait: fished all day without a bite; an ad that got a few bites but no final sales.
8.
a. A secure grip or hold applied by a tool or machine upon a working surface.
b. The part of a tool or machine that presses against and maintains a firm hold on a working surface.
9. Dentistry The angle at which the upper and lower teeth meet; occlusion.
10. The corrosive action of acid upon an etcher's metal plate.
11. Slang An amount of money appropriated or withheld: trying to avoid the tax bite.
Idioms:
bite off more than (one) can chew
To decide or agree to do more than one can finally accomplish.
bite (someone's) head off
To respond to a comment in an angry or reproachful way.
bite the bullet Slang
To face a painful situation bravely and stoically.
bite the dust Slang
1. To fall dead, especially in combat.
2. To be defeated.
3. To come to an end.
bite the hand that feeds (one)
To repay generosity or kindness with ingratitude and injury.

[Middle English biten, from Old English bītan; see bheid- in Indo-European roots.]

bit′a·ble, bite′a·ble adj.
bit′er n.

bite the dust

To be defeated, ended, or be killed; from the idea of a wounded person falling face down on the ground.
Translations
يَفْشَل، يَسْقُط، يَهْوي
neuspětselhat
bide i græsset
fûbe harap
misheppnast; bíîa bana
başarısızlığa uğramakhezimete uğramak

bite

(bait) past tense bit (bit) : past participle bitten (ˈbitn) verb
to seize, grasp or tear (something) with the teeth or jaws. The dog bit his leg; He was bitten by a mosquito.
noun
1. an act of biting or the piece or place bitten. a bite from the apple; a mosquito bite.
2. the nibble of a fish on the end of one's line. I've been fishing for hours without a bite.
ˈbiting adjective
1. very cold and causing discomfort. a biting wind.
2. wounding or hurtful. a biting remark.
bite the dust
to fail; to be unsuccessful. That's another scheme that's bitten the dust.
References in classic literature ?
Grant that my sword may pierce the shirt of Hector about his heart, and that full many of his comrades may bite the dust as they fall dying round him."
This time it's the turn of Gallan House on the corner of Hill Street and Station Street to bite the dust. The unassuming brickfaced offices were not well known by name or remarkable by sight but now they have been forced to give up their familiar position in favour of a towering hotel.
SIR - I refer to your report on the revised proposals of the Boundary Commission for Wales on Parliamentary boundaries ("Labour attacks PS1.3m 'wasted' on changes to boundaries", and Comment, "Wales will be the real winner if boundary review plans bite the dust", Oct 24).
Both will be hoping for home comforts following 1-0 first-leg away defeats to Basle and Marseille respectively and if bookmakers are correct then at least one of them could bite the dust before the quarter-finals.
QUEEN guitarist Brian May plans to be in Birmingham for the opening night of We Will Rock You - but hopes he does not bite the dust as he nearly did on his last visit.