gentian

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gen·tian

 (jĕn′shən)
n.
1. Any of numerous plants of the family Gentianaceae and especially the genus Gentiana, characteristically having opposite leaves and showy, often blue flowers.
2. The dried rhizome and roots of a yellow-flowered European gentian, G. lutea, sometimes used as a tonic.

[Middle English gencian, from Old French genciane, from Latin gentiāna, perhaps after Gentius, second-century bc king of Illyria.]

gentian

(ˈdʒɛnʃən)
n
1. (Plants) any gentianaceous plant of the genera Gentiana or Gentianella, having blue, yellow, white, or red showy flowers
2. (Plants) the bitter-tasting dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea (European or yellow gentian), which can be used as a tonic
3. (Plants) any of several similar plants, such as the horse gentian
[C14: from Latin gentiāna; perhaps named after Gentius, a second-century bc Illyrian king, reputedly the first to use it medicinally]

gen•tian

(ˈdʒɛn ʃən)

n.
1. any plant of the gentian family, esp. the genus Gentiana, having usu. blue but sometimes yellow, white, or red flowers.
2. the root of a European species of gentian, G. lutea, used as a tonic.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin gentiāna]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gentian - any of various plants of the family Gentianaceae especially the genera Gentiana and Gentianella and Gentianopsisgentian - any of various plants of the family Gentianaceae especially the genera Gentiana and Gentianella and Gentianopsis
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
family Gentianaceae, gentian family, Gentianaceae - chiefly herbaceous plants with showy flowers; some are cultivated as ornamentals
Gentiana acaulis, gentianella - low-growing alpine plant cultivated for its dark glossy green leaves in basal rosettes and showy solitary bell-shaped blue flowers
bottle gentian, Gentiana andrewsii, blind gentian, closed gentian - gentian of eastern North America having tubular blue or white flowers that open little if at all
explorer's gentian, Gentiana calycosa - tufted sometimes sprawling perennial with blue flowers spotted with green; western North America
blind gentian, closed gentian, Gentiana clausa - similar to Gentiana andrewsii but with larger flowers
Gentiana lutea, great yellow gentian - robust European perennial having clusters of yellow flowers
calathian violet, Gentiana pneumonanthe, marsh gentian - perennial Eurasian gentian with sky-blue funnel-shaped flowers of damp open heaths
Gentiana saponaria, soapwort gentian - erect perennial of wet woodlands of North America having leaves and flower buds resembling those of soapwort
Gentiana villosa, striped gentian - a perennial marsh gentian of eastern North America
ague weed, agueweed, five-flowered gentian, Gentiana quinquefolia, Gentianella quinquefolia, stiff gentian - gentian of eastern North America having clusters of bristly blue flowers
felwort, gentianella amarella - gentian of Europe and China having creamy white flowers with fringed corollas
fringed gentian - any of various herbs of the genus Gentianopsis having the margins of the corolla lobes fringed; sometimes included in genus Gentiana
spurred gentian - any of various plants of the genus Halenia having flowers with spurred lobes
Translations

gentian

[ˈdʒenʃɪən]
A. Ngenciana f
B. CPD gentian violet Nvioleta f de genciana

gentian

[ˈdʒɛnʃən] ngentiane f

gentian

nEnzian m
References in classic literature ?
The banquet was served up in primitive style: skins of various kinds, nicely dressed for the occasion, were spread upon the ground; upon these were heaped up abundance of venison, elk meat, and mountain mutton, with various bitter roots which the Indians use as condiments.
Also, with tea made from spruce needles, with concoctions brewed from the inner willow bark, and with sour and bitter roots and bulbs from the ground, they dosed his scurvy out of him, so that he ceased limping and began to lay on flesh over his bony framework.
Como Dam is owned and operated by the Bitter Root Irrigation District.
Devil's claw occurs in the desert regions of southern Africa and its bitter root has historically been used to treat a wide range of ailments and, prominently, as an anti-inflammatory and digestive.
Over time, they have been domesticated from a tough and bitter root to the familiar crisp and sweet garden vegetable we adore today.