bittern


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Related to bittern: bitten, American bittern, least bittern

bit·tern 1

 (bĭt′ərn)
n.
Any of several wading birds of the genera Botaurus and Ixobrychus, having mottled brownish plumage and, in most species, a deep booming cry in the male.

[Alteration (perhaps influenced by tern) of Middle English bitour, from Old French butor, possibly from Vulgar Latin *buti-taurus : Latin būtiō, buzzard + Latin taurus, bull (after its cry); see tauro- in Indo-European roots.]

bit·tern 2

 (bĭt′ərn)
n.
The bitter water solution of bromides, magnesium, and calcium salts remaining after sodium chloride is crystallized out of seawater.

[From bitter.]

bittern

(ˈbɪtən)
n
(Animals) any wading bird of the genera Ixobrychus and Botaurus, related and similar to the herons but with shorter legs and neck, a stouter body, and a booming call: family Ardeidae, order Ciconiiformes
[C14: from Old French butor, perhaps from Latin būtiō bittern + taurus bull; referring to its cry]

bittern

(ˈbɪtən)
n
(Chemistry) the bitter liquid remaining after common salt has been crystallized out of sea water: a source of magnesium, bromine, and iodine compounds
[C17: variant of bittering]

bit•tern1

(ˈbɪt ərn)

n.
any of several brown-and-buff wading birds of the heron family, inhabiting reedy marshes in both the Old and New Worlds.
[1510–20; earlier bitter, bittor, Middle English bito(u)r < Anglo-French bytore, Anglo-French, Old French butor < Vulgar Latin *būtitaurus]

bit•tern2

(ˈbɪt ərn)

n.
a bitter solution remaining in saltmaking after the salt has crystallized out of seawater or brine, used as a source of bromides, iodides, and certain other salts.
[1675–85; variant of bittering]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bittern - relatively small compact tawny-brown heron with nocturnal habits and a booming crybittern - relatively small compact tawny-brown heron with nocturnal habits and a booming cry; found in marshes
heron - grey or white wading bird with long neck and long legs and (usually) long bill
Ixobrychus exilis, least bittern - small American bittern

bittern

noun
Related words
collective noun sedge or siege
Translations
bukač
botaŭro
kaulushaikaranokihaikarapikkuhaikara
bölömbika
bukač

bittern

[ˈbɪtɜːn] Navetoro m (común)

bittern

nRohrdommel f

bittern

[ˈbɪtɜːn] ntarabuso
References in classic literature ?
Fox and woodchuck, hawk and snipe and bittern, when nearly seen, have no more root in the deep world than man, and are just such superficial tenants of the globe.
It was a common sound in those parts--as common as the chatter of the jays and the booming of the bittern.
We need the tonic of wildness -- to wade sometimes in marshes where the bittern and the meadow-hen lurk, and hear the booming of the snipe; to smell the whispering sedge where only some wilder and more solitary fowl builds her nest, and the mink crawls with its belly close to the ground.
When they went once more into the long hall with the windows and the mirrors, yellow evening was dropping over the waters and the willowy banks; and a bittern sounded in the distance like an elf upon his dwarfish drum.
The sunset gold still glowed on the lawn, and the bittern still boomed as announcing some small but dreadful destiny.
It is in this way that small knots of trappers and hunters are distributed about the wilderness by the fur companies, and like cranes and bitterns, haunt its solitary streams.
Yes, I should not be surprised to learn that what we have heard is the cry of the last of the bitterns.
Bittern called into town for a 20-minute stop on her journey from the Crewe Heritage Centre to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, where she will spend much of the summer.
The total number of species seen at the site now totals 129, boosted this year by four new sightings, including a rare bittern which is a reed-loving bird.
Price includes: Private coach travel throughout Three nights' dinner, bed and cooked breakfast Entrance to The View from the Shard Free time in London Visit to Camden, Greenwich and Covent Garden Services of our tour driver Six Special Steam Trains Departs 13 July 2013 Join us for a never-before-seen line up of all six surviving A4 class locomotives at the National Railway Museum in York, where the fastest steam locomotive in the world, Mallard, will be joined by Sir Nigel Gresley, Bittern, Union of South Africa and their transatlantic twins Dwight D Eisenhower and Dominion of Canada.
The bittern comes from the heron family with a pale brown plumage covered in dark bars and streaks.
The bittern, a rare member of the heron family which is famous for its booming call, is believed to have been forced to seek refuge from the cold snap in Co Wexford.