bizarrerie

(redirected from bizarreries)

bizarrerie

(bɪˈzɑːrərɪ)
n
1. the quality of being bizarre
2. a bizarre act
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bizarrerie

strangeness or grotesqueness, especially strange or unconventional behavior.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
She would show, too, some stores of raillery, of "malice," and would vex, tease, pique me sometimes about what she called my "bizarreries anglaises," my "caprices insulaires," with a wild and witty wickedness that made a perfect white demon of her while it lasted.
Contact with the stage, almost throughout its history, presents itself as a kind of touchstone, to bring out the bizarrerie, the theatrical tricks and contrasts, of the actual world.
To Tess's sense there was, just at first, a ghastly BIZARRERIE, a grim incongruity, in the march of these solemn words of Scripture out of such a mouth.
It was a freak of fancy in my friend (for what else shall I call it?) to be enamored of the Night for her own sake; and into this bizarrerie, as into all his others, I quietly fell; giving myself up to his wild whims with a perfect abandon.
Inquirer's Solita Collas Monsod wrote a piece called 'Donald Duterte and Rody Trump' (11/3/18), where she reflected on the bizarreries of the two leaders.
On pourrait enumerer a flot, des exemples ecoeurants de ces bizarreries, on en finirait jamais !
In this shift a threefold subversion takes place, which follows the logic of the imaginary, symbolic, and real: theory's heavenly image is debased by its transposition into the stupidest of slips and the bizarreries of dreams, while the substance of thought is referred to the materiality of the signifier (wordplay and nonsensical combinations, or as Plato would have it, the rolling, turning, and dividing of discourse, its "immortal and ageless condition"); finally the ideal of pure pleasure is supplanted by masochism.
Thus Montesquieu, while emphasizing the "bizarreries" of the nobility's "point of honor," shows that the passion of the point of honor effectively sustains a vigorous disposition to liberty, since it introduces certain "necessary modifications in the obedience" due to a prince.
Jamais il ne fait appel a aucune cause de lordre des choses, il fait toujours appel a l'air, aux cieux, a leau et a un tas d'autres bizarreries (98c).
Des œuvres ayant pour titres Oil, Ego, Algeia, Geronimo, ou Femmes parlant de la tragedie, des inegalites et des bizarreries de ce monde.