black art


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Related to black art: black magic

black art

n.
Black magic; witchcraft.

black art

n
(Alternative Belief Systems) the black art another name for black magic

black′ art′


n.
Often, black arts. witchcraft, sorcery, or other occult practice used for evil purposes.
[1580–90]

black art

Another name for black magic or witchcraft.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.black art - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the worldblack art - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
witchcraft, witchery - the art of sorcery
bewitchment, enchantment - a magical spell
demonism, diabolism, Satanism - a belief in and reverence for devils (especially Satan)
obiism - belief in a kind of sorcery that originated in Africa and is practiced in the West Indies
References in classic literature ?
The local witch-doctor, knowing his own medicine better than any other knew it, was jealous of all other pretenders to accomplishments in the black art. He long had heard of the power of Bukawai, and feared lest, should he succeed in recovering Momaya's lost child, much of the tribal patronage and consequent fees would be diverted to the unclean one.
look here, Joseph,' she continued, taking a long, dark book from a shelf; 'I'll show you how far I've progressed in the Black Art: I shall soon be competent to make a clear house of it.
For her own part, she had reason to believe that he practised animal magnetism, and, if such things were in fashion nowadays, should be apt to suspect him of studying the Black Art up there in his lonesome chamber.
Reports were various as to the nature of his fortunate speculation: one intimating that the ancient Peter had made the gold by alchemy; another, that he had conjured it out of people's pockets by the black art; and a third, still more unaccountable, that the devil had given him free access to the old provincial treasury.
W., was under the constant necessity of referring for advice and support to a sage volume entitled The Complete British Family Housewife, which she would sit consulting, with her elbows on the table and her temples on her hands, like some perplexed enchantress poring over the Black Art. This, principally because the Complete British Housewife, however sound a Briton at heart, was by no means an expert Briton at expressing herself with clearness in the British tongue, and sometimes might have issued her directions to equal purpose in the Kamskatchan language.
I was a champion, it was true, but not the champion of the frivolous black arts, I was the champion of hard unsentimental common-sense and reason.
"Scragga, son of Twala, the great king--Twala, husband of a thousand wives, chief and lord paramount of the Kukuanas, keeper of the great Road, terror of his enemies, student of the Black Arts, leader of a hundred thousand warriors, Twala the One-eyed, the Black, the Terrible."
Visit the Navy Yard, and behold a marine, such a man as an American government can make, or such as it can make a man with its black arts -- a mere shadow and reminiscence of humanity, a man laid out alive and standing, and already, as one may say, buried under arms with funeral accompaniments, though it may be
Harvey envisions the role of the Black art educator today as one who develops students who are critically examining the museum and providing "groundbreaking, provocative cultural interpretation" of images they see in the world around them, she says.
Black Renaissance: A Celebration of Black Art presented by the A.R.T.
Chronicling the development of the New Negro Movement (Harlem Renaissance) and Black Power Movement, Sorett's analysis brings together the voices and contributions of prominent and lesser known literary and religious figures who often battled over the meaning of blackness and black art as well as black religion and spirituality.
Historically, religious elements related to Candomble and Umbandas deities and practices have shaped most of what is understood as "black art" in Brazil.