black nationalism


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Related to black nationalism: Black Panthers

Black Nationalist

n.
A member of a group of militant black people who urge separatism from white people and the establishment of self-governing black communities.

Black Nationalism n.

black′ na′tionalism


n.
(often caps.)
a social and political movement advocating the separation of blacks and whites and self-government for black people.
[1965–70]
black′ na′tionalist, n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Formulating an erstwhile womanhood based on Black Nationalism.
A chapter in Chris Dixon's African America and Haiti: Emigration and Black Nationalism in the Nineteenth Century (2000) remains a staple work in discussions of African American migration.
Nineteenth-century Black nationalism and Pan Africanism, two intertwined projects, are important templates for assessing circum-Atlantic intellectual discourses.
He was also exposed to a wide range of ideas such as black nationalism, German American labor activism, and Unitarianism.
In addition, Christensen stresses that the arts played a role in more than mere entertainment but contained political implications in the tradition of the Rasta culture, pan-Africanism, Black Nationalism or a combination of the three.
And, not only does Shadd Cary construct protofeminist images of Black nationalism that disrupt racist and patriarchal figures of respectable womanhood, her rhetorical structuring of these images reveals a strategic interaction with multiple discursive worlds and simultaneous associations and dissociations with various aspects of her discursive communities and perceptions of her presences as a Black woman public speaker and author.
Selena Sanderfer's article examines the manifestation of Black Nationalism in the form of territorial separatism, in the nineteenth century.
The sensibility in the story is universal, historical and dialectical in nature, covering the period of colonialism and neocolonialism and even projecting a futurism which is undefined in terms of the prospects of Black nationalism.
He looks at police brutality and internal colonialism in the 1930s, black mobilization around the 1939 local elections, the intersection of racial control and the war-time economy in which Detroit was at the center, Black Nationalism in Sherrill's Michigan Chronicle, forging a legacy for Garveyism and the UNIA in the post-war years, and the UNIA during the Civil Rights era.
Although King accepts the charge that he is "an extremist"--like Jesus and Amos and Martin Luther--he also presents himself as a moderate, and as the only alternative between do- nothing complacency and separatist, violent black nationalism.
The eclectic, eccentric, and at times contradictory melding of the politics of feminism, Marxism-Leninism, Garveyism, and much else that came together in the Black nationalism of "Queen Mother" Moore was, at times, a bizarre fusion, but it is presented by McDuffie as a "creative weave.
Keywords: Rap, Black Nationalism, political rap, Black political attitudes, popular culture, public opinion