comfrey

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com·frey

 (kŭm′frē)
n. pl. com·freys
Any of various hairy perennial Eurasian herbs of the genus Symphytum, especially S. officinale, having variously colored flowers in coiled cymes and long used in herbal medicine.

[Middle English comferi, from Old French cumfirie, from Vulgar Latin *cōnfervia, from Latin cōnferva, from cōnfervēre, to boil together : com-, com- + fervēre, to boil; see fervent.]

comfrey

(ˈkʌmfrɪ)
n
(Plants) any hairy Eurasian boraginaceous plant of the genus Symphytum, having blue, purplish-pink, or white flowers
[C15: from Old French cunfirie, from Latin conferva water plant; see conferva]

com•frey

(ˈkʌm fri)

n., pl. -freys.
any of various coarse Eurasian plants of the genus Symphytum, borage family, having hairy leaves and drooping flower clusters.
[1275–1325; Middle English cumfirie, conferye < Anglo-French cumfirie, Old French confire < Vulgar Latin *confervia, for Latin conferva a water plant supposed to heal wounds, derivative of confervēre to grow together, heal; see con-, fervent]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comfrey - perennial herbs of Europe and Irancomfrey - perennial herbs of Europe and Iran; make rapidly growing groundcover for shaded areas
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
boneset, common comfrey, Symphytum officinale - European herb having small white, pink or purple flowers; naturalized as a weed in North America
2.comfrey - leaves make a popular tisanecomfrey - leaves make a popular tisane; young leaves used in salads or cooked
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
boneset, common comfrey, Symphytum officinale - European herb having small white, pink or purple flowers; naturalized as a weed in North America
Translations
valurt

comfrey

[ˈkʌmfrɪ] Nconsuelda f

comfrey

[ˈkʌmfri] n (= herb) → consoude f

comfrey

n (bot) consuelda
References in classic literature ?
Know then that if these rows were dug up the wealth of the country would be gone, and mayhap there would be dry throats and gaping mouths in England, for in three months' time these black roots will blossom and snoot and burgeon, and from them will come many a good ship-load of Medoc and Gascony which will cross the narrow seas.
After harvesting the seven tonnes of the produce, he feeds the green fibrous part and produce considered rejects to his two three Friesian cows.Powdery mildew, black root rot and bacteria wilt are some of the diseases that affect carrots.
Similar host plant resistance research into Black root rot, Verticillium wilt, Fusarium wilt, whitefly and two spotted mites are also under development.
The severity of tobacco black root rot was reduced when soil was amended with phloroglucinol (Keel et al., 1992).
As Bill Booth and I walked barefoot through the seeping saltwater, looking for souvenirs, Bill suddenly pointed to a black root the size and shape of a man's penis and said, "Well, there's part of him." We both laughed at death, no more than a casual acquaintance.
* other bicolored ordered trees, called non-seed trees with either a white or a black root vertex,
R bunodes causes black root rot mainly in tropical woody hosts.
Strawberry plants grown in compost-filled mesh tubes, or "socks," had significantly less chance of getting black root rot, a severe threat to yields, than plants grown directly in infested soils reveals an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) study.
But tests have shown that planting strawberries in these flexible tubes significantly reduced incidence of black root rot and increased yields 16- to 32-fold.
He went on to study metabolites from fungi that are responsible for a number of other diseases--canker formation in plants, for black root disease in pine, for Dutch elm disease, and from fungi that inhibit Dutch elm disease.
Flor de Mayo 2000 carries the single dominant hypersensitive Igene for resistance to Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) but is sensitive to the necrosis-inducing strains of Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV), which induce the black root reaction.