black section

black section

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Britain in the 1980s) an unofficial group within the Labour Party in any constituency that represented the interests of local Black people
References in periodicals archive ?
We had to sit in the black section. When we got to Illinois, the conductor said we could sit anywhere we liked on the train," Bell said, "and we no longer had to say 'sir 'or 'ma'am' to white people, which was new to us."
There will be a new blue grade trail (1.4km long) to appeal families and beginners; a new red trail (1km long) suitable for intermediates, a new black section (0.7km) to link to the existing trail network.
But it was pitch-black because of great depth, with a 90-degree bend towards some rapids or small waterfall.This black section was defined by sheer walls of vertical rock, smooth, without a handhold or foothold.
The remarks were delivered from the back of a flatbed truck in a black section of Indianapolis, Indiana, where Kennedy was attending a campaign rally.
But the play is set 30 years before that--in a lower-middle-class black section of Pittsburgh in the mid-1950s--and when you watch it now, in the impassioned screen version directed by its star, Denzel Washington, it feels like you're seeing a work from a distant time.
These were the chestnut Section B Hilin Primadonna from Dewi Evans of Pentrefoelas, and the black Section A Telynau Black Swan from David Jones and Geraint Thomas of Llanwnda, Caernarfon.
In 1955, buses were segregated in the US, a black woman in Montgomery Alabama by the name of Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat in the black section of the bus to a white person, as she was required to do so by law.
Had I lived a few miles away, in the majority black section of Chicago, the story would have been different.
Also, the belt line that separates the lower black section from the body panel has been heightened to give the car a wider and more aggressive look from the rear.
And there was a black section. The poorest part of town.