black-backed gull


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black-backed gull

n
1. (Animals) either of two common black-and-white European coastal gulls, Larus fuscus (lesser black-backed gull) and L. marinus (great black-backed gull)
2. (Animals) Also called: karoro a southern gull, larus dominicanus, with black feathers on its back
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.black-backed gull - white gull having a black back and wingsblack-backed gull - white gull having a black back and wings
sea gull, seagull, gull - mostly white aquatic bird having long pointed wings and short legs
genus Larus, Larus - type genus of the Laridae
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for supply 10 each bird satellite transmitters for the lesser black-backed gull which helps track pa~s birds to breeding sites using telemetry.
The 38 breeding pairs of endangered little terns, which share the Long Nanny site, produced 125 eggs and hatched 63, but fledged only five young - and one of those was taken by a black-backed gull.
On a December morning, many years ago, I brought a young, injured black-backed gull home from the beach.
1996), eight species of gulls may occur in northern Norway: Mew Gull, Larus canus\ Great Black-backed Gull, Larus marinus; Glaucous Gull, Larus hyperboreus; Iceland Gull, Larus glaucoides; Herring Gull, Larus argentatus; Lesser Black-backed Gull, Larus fuscus\ Black-headed Gull, Chroicocephalus ridibundus\ and Little Gull, Hydrocoloeus minutus.
The Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus), which had a distribution of colony sizes much like Sabine's Gull on the YKD, tended to forage close to the nest.
It is the great black-backed gull, which is the scarcest of our regular breeding species.
THE great black-backed gull (larus marinus) is the largest gull in the world.
The black-backed gull was found by builders working near Station Road in Llanddulas.
The Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) is a very large gull which breeds on the European and North American coasts and islands of the North Atlantic.
They usually sneak out of the nest under the cover of darkness to avoid predators such as the black-backed gull and the great skua.
The duckling had tried to swim to its mother as the lesser black-backed gull approached but didn't make it.
While there are at least 11 different types of gulls in the UK, the ones we are the most likely to see here in Birmingham is the lesser black-backed gull.