blackwood


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Black·wood

 (blăk′wo͝od′), William 1776-1834.
British publisher and editor (1817-1834) of Blackwood's Magazine, a Tory literary review that published Wordsworth and Shelley among others.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blackwood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: Sally Wattle a tall Australian acacia tree, A. melanoxylon, having small clusters of flowers and curved pods and yielding highly valued black timber
2. (Plants) any of various trees or shrubs of the leguminous genus Dalbergia, esp D. melanoxylon (of Africa) or D. latifolia (of India), yielding black wood used for carving and musical instruments
3. (Plants) the wood of any of these trees

Blackwood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)
n
(Bridge) bridge a conventional bidding sequence of four and five no-trumps, which are requests to the partner to show aces and kings respectively
[C20: named after Easeley F. Blackwood, its American inventor]

Blackwood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)
n
(Biography) Algernon (Henry). 1869–1951, British novelist and short-story writer; noted for his supernatural tales
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Black•wood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)

n.
William, 1776–1834, English publisher.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blackwood - very dark wood of any of several blackwood trees
blackwood tree, blackwood - any of several hardwood trees yielding very dark-colored wood
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.Blackwood - any of several hardwood trees yielding very dark-colored woodblackwood - any of several hardwood trees yielding very dark-colored wood
Acacia melanoxylon, lightwood - tall Australian acacia yielding highly valued black timber
campeachy, Haematoxylum campechianum, logwood tree, bloodwood tree, logwood - spiny shrub or small tree of Central America and West Indies having bipinnate leaves and racemes of small bright yellow flowers and yielding a hard brown or brownish-red heartwood used in preparing a black dye
blackwood - very dark wood of any of several blackwood trees
Avicennia marina, black mangrove - a mangrove of the West Indies and the southern Florida coast; occurs in dense thickets and has numerous short roots that bend up from the ground
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
I fancy it was well for me at this period to have got at the four great English reviews, the Edinburgh, the Westminster, the London Quarterly, and the North British, which I read regularly, as well as Blackwood's Magazine.
To be sure I often broke this rule, as people are apt to do with rules of the kind; it was not possible for a boy to wade through heavy articles relating to English politics and economics, but I do not think I left any paper upon a literary topic unread, and I did read enough politics, especially in Blackwood's, to be of Tory opinions; they were very fit opinions for a boy, and they did not exact of me any change in regard to the slavery question.
I admit that I was absorbed by the distant view, so absorbed that I didn't notice then that the motif of the story is almost identical with the motif of "The Lagoon." However, the idea at the back is very different; but the story is mainly made memorable to me by the fact that it was my first contribution to "Blackwood's Magazine" and that it led to my personal acquaintance with Mr.
The period is that which follows on my connection with Blackwood's Magazine.
The combined fleets of 1805, just come out of port, and attended by nothing but the disturbing memories of reverses, presented to our approach a determined front, on which Captain Blackwood, in a knightly spirit, congratulated his Admiral.
Its politics were strongly liberal, and to oppose it the Tory 'Quarterly Review' was founded in 1808, under the editorship of the satirist William Gifford and with the cooperation of Sir Walter Scott, who withdrew for the purpose from his connection with the 'Edinburgh.' These reviews were followed by other high-class periodicals, such as 'Blackwood's Magazine,' and most of the group have maintained their importance to the present day.
It is the assertion, the development, the product of those very different indispensable qualities of poetry, in the presence [8] of which the English is equal or superior to all other modern literature--the native, sublime, and beautiful, but often wild and irregular, imaginative power in English poetry from Chaucer to Shakespeare, with which Professor Minto deals, in his Characteristics of English Poets (Blackwood), lately reprinted.
His articles in BLACKWOOD and his lectures on Mont Blanc in London advertised it and made people as anxious to see it as if it owed them money.
Fall of wickets: 1-9 (Brathwaite), 2-37 (Campbell), 3-97 (Chase), 4-98 (Hetmyer), 5-159 (Blackwood), 6-177 (Brooks), 7-177 (Hamilton), 8-180 (Cornwall), 9-206 (Roach), 10-210 (Holder)
Writers and reviewers throughout the last 100 years have been extolling the virtues of the tales of novelist and short story writer Algernon Blackwood (14 March 1869-10 December 1951).
Isabelle Blackwood Isabelle Blackwood, age 84, passed away on March 31, 2019 at Church Creek in Arlington Heights surrounded by her family and church friends.
Yet Blackwood, a town with a major bus station, which has a weekly footfall of 34,924, 10,000 more than Caerphilly, is about to lose its only public toilet in order to save PS20,000 a year.