blagueur

blagueur

(blaɡœr)
n
a person who engages in blague
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Herd manager, Nick Schofield, said: "All the heifers are bred from our own noted stock bulls, Lowerfrydd Empire, Grahams Dublin, Dinmore Bandit and Blagueur. Froufrou was sired by Casimir and has been used extensively at Whinfell Park, with calves on the ground.
1910 Jerry M and Blagueur won France's two biggest jumps races 100 years ago.
Le guide Anatole, qui incarne le boheme blagueur dans ce roman, accumule dans sa description historique inexactitudes et absurdites:
Un blagueur ne saurait livrer l'oeuvre d'art que se veut de toute evidence cette description, seul l'artiste pour lequel la creation est douleur peut en etre la source.
"Blogger," despite a resemblance to the French word "blagueur" or "joker," is becoming a label more and more Internet users wear proudly, according to "Bloggers: A Portrait of the Internet's New Storytellers." The July 19 report was released by the Pew Internet & American Life Project.
Le pere est presente comme un homme gai et blagueur, soucieux du qu'en-dira-t-on.
149) is humour personified, a 'blagueur' par excellence.
Gaspard is incorruptible, irrepressible, indomitable; the amputation of a leg after his second, even briefer visit to the front brings out the very best of the 'blagueur' in him.
The speaker's refusal of these aesthetic strategies leads him to question his own stance and to reveal that he too is a poet cultivating a pose: "On veut, aveugle taciturne, / A soi tout seul etre blagueur" (777).
In describing the poet as a blagueur, Corbiere equates him with the established Parisian type, whose subversive mockery had become routine, mocked by the Goncourt brothers as "la revolte parisienne de la desillusion, la formule legere et gamine du blaspheme." (11) Corbiere's language is also frequently reminiscent of the blague.