blasting


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Related to blasting: Explosives, Sand blasting, Grit blasting

blast

 (blăst)
n.
1.
a. A very strong gust of wind or air.
b. The effect of such a gust.
2. A forcible stream of air, gas, or steam from an opening, especially one in a blast furnace to aid combustion.
3.
a. A sudden loud sound, especially one produced by a stream of forced air: a piercing blast from the steam whistle.
b. The act of producing such a sound: gave a blast on his trumpet.
4.
a. A violent explosion, as of dynamite or a bomb.
b. The violent effect of such an explosion, consisting of a wave of increased atmospheric pressure followed immediately by a wave of decreased pressure.
c. An explosive charge.
5. Botany Any of several plant diseases of diverse causes, resulting in sudden death of buds, flowers, foliage, or young fruits.
6. A destructive or damaging influence.
7. A powerful hit, blow, or shot.
8. A violent verbal assault or outburst: The candidate leveled a blast at her opponent.
9. Slang A highly exciting or pleasurable experience or event, such as a big party.
v. blast·ed, blast·ing, blasts
v.tr.
1. To knock down or shatter by explosion; smash.
2. To play or sound loudly: The amplifiers blasted the music.
3.
a. To cause to move with great force; hurl: The volcanic eruption blasted rock far and wide.
b. To make or open by explosion: blast a tunnel through the mountains.
4.
a. To shoot or destroy by shooting: fighter jets trying to blast each other out of the sky.
b. Sports To hit, kick, or shoot (a ball or puck) with great force.
5. To have a harmful or destructive effect on: a loss that blasted our hopes of making the playoffs.
6. To criticize or attack vigorously: blasted the mayor for hypocrisy.
7. To cause to shrivel, wither, or mature imperfectly by blast or blight: crops that were blasted by frost.
v.intr.
1. To use or detonate explosives.
2. To emit a loud, intense sound; blare: speakers blasting at full volume.
3. To discharge a weapon. especially repeatedly; shoot: blasted away at the target.
4. To attack someone or something verbally; criticize.
5. To move with great speed or power: a motorcycle blasting down the road.
6. Electronics To distort sound recording or transmission by overloading a microphone or loudspeaker.
7. To wither or shrivel or mature imperfectly.
Phrasal Verb:
blast off
To take off, as a rocket.
Idiom:
full blast
At full speed, volume, or capacity: turned the radio up full blast.

[Middle English, from Old English blǣst; see bhlē- in Indo-European roots.]

blast′er n.
Synonyms: blast, blight, dash1, wither, wreck
These verbs mean to have a pernicious, destructive, or ruinous effect on something: actions that blasted any chance for peace; a neighborhood blighted by poverty; ambitions dashed by lack of funds; a harsh critique that withered their enthusiasm; a life wrecked by depression.

blasting

(ˈblɑːstɪŋ)
n
(Electrical Engineering) a distortion of sound caused by overloading certain components of a radio system
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.blasting - causing injury or blightblasting - causing injury or blight; especially affecting with sudden violence or plague or ruin; "the blasting effects of the intense cold on the budding fruit"; "the blasting force of the wind blowing sharp needles of sleet in our faces"; "a ruinous war"
destructive - causing destruction or much damage; "a policy that is destructive to the economy"; "destructive criticism"
2.blasting - unpleasantly loud and penetratingblasting - unpleasantly loud and penetrating; "the blaring noise of trumpets"; "shut our ears against the blasting music from his car radio"
loud - characterized by or producing sound of great volume or intensity; "a group of loud children"; "loud thunder"; "her voice was too loud"; "loud trombones"
Translations
تَفْجير، نَسْف
odstřelování
sprænge
sprenging
odstrel
dinamitle parçalama/atma

blasting

[ˈblɑːstɪŋ] N
1. (Tech) → voladura f
"blasting in progress"explosión controlada en curso
2. (= rebuke) to give sb a blasting for (having done) sthechar una bronca or abroncar a algn por (haber hecho) algo

blasting

n (Tech) → Sprengen nt; “danger blasting in progress”Achtung! Sprengarbeiten!“ ? sandblasting

blasting

[ˈblɑːstɪŋ] n (Tech) → brillamento
"blasting in progress" → "attenzione: esplosione mine"

blast

(blaːst) noun
1. a strong, sudden stream (of air). a blast of cold air.
2. a loud sound. a blast on the horn.
3. an explosion. the blast from a bomb.
verb
1. to tear (apart etc) by an explosion. The door was blasted off its hinges.
2. (often with out) to come or be sent out, very loudly. Music (was being) blasted out from the radio.
ˈblasting noun
in mining etc, the breaking up of rock etc by explosives.
blast furnace noun
a furnace for melting iron ore using blasts of hot air.
at full blast
at full power, speed etc. He had the radio going at full blast (= as loud as possible).
blast off (of rockets, spacecraft etc) to take off and start to rise ( ˈblast-off) noun
References in classic literature ?
Along in this region a multitude of Italian laborers were blasting away the frontage of the hills to make room for the new railway.
Siskind, D.: 2001, Structural response and damage by grow, vibration from surface mine blasting, USBM RJ 8507, 137 pp.
The blasting pressure of each nozzle is also individually regulated.
The website re-introduces Sani Blast's anilox roll cleaning equipment and service offerings, particularly the rare on-press, soda blasting method of cleaning.
Abstract: Dry ice blasting and [CO.sub.2]-snow blasting are well as highly flexible and environmentally friendly alternatives for established cleaning technologies.
Dry-ice blasting is rapidly becoming the preferred method of cleaning wood in the restoration industry due to its unparalleled results and timesavings when compared to the usual methods of sanding or scraping with a wire brush.
The application of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and plastic media for blasting and erosion wear of wood is studied.
NAWABSHAH -- Panic gripped the entire area when a blasting device went off near Habib Sugar Mills while sound of blast was heard in many parts of the city.
Since the first application of black powder for blasting in 1627, blasters and engineers have been using powder factor as a design tool.
Along with the surface preparation of tooling, typically these highly compact automated blast systems are often specified, by customers, for grit blasting turbine blades and medical implants.
Blast casting design is focused simply on the throw and movement of the material rather than the fragmentation of rock in classical rock blasting. Due in part to three main reasons: