blastoderm

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blas·to·derm

 (blăs′tə-dûrm′)
n.
1. The layer of cells that develops on the surface of the yolk in an avian or reptilian egg and gives rise to the germinal disk from which the embryo develops.
2. The layer of cells formed by the cleavage of a fertilized mammalian egg. It later divides into the three germ layers from which the embryo develops.

blas′to·der·mat′ic (-dər-măt′ĭk), blas′to·der′mic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blastoderm

(ˈblæstəʊˌdɜːm)
n
1. (Biology) the layer of cells that surrounds the blastocoel of a blastula
2. (Biology) a flat disc of cells formed after cleavage in a heavily yolked egg, such as a bird's egg
Also called: blastodisc
ˌblastoˈdermic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

blas•to•derm

(ˈblæs təˌdɜrm)

n.
1. the primitive layer of cells that results from the segmentation of the ovum.
2. the layer of cells forming the wall of the blastula and in most vertebrates enclosing a cavity or a yolk mass.
[1855–60]
blas`to•der′mic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blastoderm - a layer of cells on the inside of the blastulablastoderm - a layer of cells on the inside of the blastula
layer - thin structure composed of a single thickness of cells
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
28(93.33%) chicks hatched on day 21 by themselves while 2(6.66%) did not hatch and when broken on day 22 they were found to be macerated early vascularised blastoderms. Chicken embryos exposed to valproic acid in ovo showed increased mortality (pless than 0.001) and delayed hatching (pless than 0.001) (Table-2).
This also allowed the blastoderm to rotate and come to lie above the blunt end which protected it from getting damaged while the drug was being injected at the lower end.
One had arrested growth at early vascularised blastoderm stage.