blepharoptosis


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Related to blepharoptosis: blepharospasm, blepharophimosis

blepharoptosis

Pathology. a drooping of the upper eyelid.
See also: Eyes
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Blepharoptosis (ptosis) [degrees] Hyaluronic acid (HA) 4.4.3.
To the Editor: Blepharoptosis is a disease commonly seen in the Asian population, defined as an abnormal lower upper eyelid margin that is <2.0 mm above the midpoint of the pupil when a person looks straightforward.
In many patients, eyelid droop described as blepharoptosis is the first known symptom.
Fourteen patients developed other conditions, such as blepharoptosis and facial nerve paralysis (Table 2).
Blepharoptosis usually deteriorates by the end of the day, as a result of overexhaustion of Muller's muscle [1,11,12].
Eye pain due to trigeminal nerve stimulation, eye movement disorder (double vision) caused by oculomotor nerve disorders, visual deficit due to optic nerve disorders, and blepharoptosis due to sympathetic nervous system disorders are present.
Both groups of patients underwent blepharoplasty of the superior eyelid for blepharoptosis on the affected side and blepharoplasty on the healthy side for esthetic reasons.
Complications were only mild with reports of ecchymosis in three patients, while five patients had mild blepharoptosis readily reversed with hyaluronidase.
Ptosis, also named as blepharoptosis, is an ocular condition in which the upper lid margin is abnormally lower than its normal location with the eye in primary gaze.
Neonatal examination showed facial dysmorphic features, including marked facial asymmetry with right hemifacial microsomia, hypoplasia of the right mandibular ramus and condyle, bilateral blepharoptosis, and mild hypertelorism.
Subjects were diagnosed with blepharoptosis when their marginal reflex distance (MRD1; the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the corneal light reflex) was 2 mm or less.
The typical clinical features include myosis, ipsilateral blepharoptosis, enophthalmos, facial anhydrosis, and vascular dilation of the lateral part of the face.