blind alley

(redirected from blind alleys)
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blind alley

n.
1. An alley or passage that is closed at one end.
2. A mistaken, unproductive undertaking.

blind alley

n
1. an alley open at one end only; cul-de-sac
2. informal a situation in which no further progress can be made

blind′ al′ley


n.
1. a roadway that is open at only one end.
2. a situation or path offering no help, opportunity, or reward.
[1575–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blind alley - a street with only one way in or outblind alley - a street with only one way in or out
thoroughfare - a public road from one place to another
2.blind alley - (figurative) a course of action that is unproductive and offers no hope of improvement; "all the clues led the police into blind alleys"; "so far every road that we've been down has turned out to be a blind alley"
course of action, course - a mode of action; "if you persist in that course you will surely fail"; "once a nation is embarked on a course of action it becomes extremely difficult for any retraction to take place"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense

blind alley

noun
A course leading nowhere:
Translations
طَريٌ مَسْدود
slepá ulička
blindgydevildspor
zsákutca
blindgata
slepá ulička
çıkmazçözümü olmayan sorun

blind alley

nvicolo cieco

blind

(blaind) adjective
1. not able to see. a blind man.
2. (with to) unable to notice. She is blind to his faults.
3. hiding what is beyond. a blind corner.
4. of or for blind people. a blind school.
noun
1. (often in plural) a screen to prevent light coming through a window etc. The sunlight is too bright – pull down the blinds!
2. something intended to mislead or deceive. He did that as a blind.
verb
to make blind. He was blinded in the war.
ˈblinding adjective
1. tending to make blind. a blinding light.
2. sudden. He realized, in a blinding flash, that she was the murderer.
ˈblindly adverb
ˈblindness noun
blind alley
a situation without any way out. This is a blind alley of a job.
ˈblindfold noun
a piece of cloth etc put over the eyes to prevent someone from seeing. The kidnappers put a blindfold over the child's eyes.
verb
to put a blindfold on (some person or animal).
adjective, adverb
with the eyes covered by a cloth etc. She came blindfold into the room.
blind spot
1. any matter about which one always shows lack of understanding. She seems to have a blind spot about physics.
2. an area which is impossible or difficult to see due to an obstruction.
the blind leading the blind
one inexperienced or incompetent person telling another about something. My teaching you about politics will be a case of the blind leading the blind.
References in classic literature ?
In practice they had come to be considered a little too bad, though in theory they were quite as good as ever; which may be observed to be the case at the present day with other cells that are not at all strong, and with other blind alleys that are stone-blind.
Offenders against the revenue laws, and defaulters to excise or customs who had incurred fines which they were unable to pay, were supposed to be incarcerated behind an iron-plated door closing up a second prison, consisting of a strong cell or two, and a blind alley some yard and a half wide, which formed the mysterious termination of the very limited skittle-ground in which the Marshalsea debtors bowled down their troubles.
The rat starts running down the passages, and is constantly stopped by blind alleys, but at last, by persistent attempts, it gets out.
With that thought in his heart, Richard Turlington wound his way through the streets by the river-side, and stopped at a blind alley called Green Anchor Lane, infamous to this day as the chosen resort of the most abandoned wretches whom London can produce.
And he did not like it when the process of reasoning brought him into a blind alley.
We interviewed also through a grating in a mud wall closing a blind alley an immensely corpulent Ital ian, who, the ex-sergeant-major remarked to me perfunctorily, had "killed another man last year.
I could have told him from the beginning that this obsession of his over the coffee was bound to end in a blind alley, but I restrained my tongue.
Saillard's salary from the government had always been four thousand five hundred francs a year, and no more; his situation was a blind alley that led nowhere, and had tempted no one to supersede him.
sport@ com Collectively, we handled their pattern of play really well and forced them to run down blind alleys a lot of the time.
It has been said that Lennon was looking tired but he was only looking that way because West Brom were overloading our right hand side with defenders, so he ran into blind alleys.
JOE MASON Starved of service and left to little runs that got him nowhere led to blind alleys.
THE labyrinthian plot of this Peter James thriller takes you down several blind alleys before the real killer is unmasked.