blind snake


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

blind snake

n
(Animals) any burrowing snake of the family Typhlopidae and related families of warm and tropical regions, having very small or vestigial eyes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blind snake - wormlike burrowing snake of warm regions having vestigial eyesblind snake - wormlike burrowing snake of warm regions having vestigial eyes
ophidian, serpent, snake - limbless scaly elongate reptile; some are venomous
Leptotyphlops humilis, western blind snake - burrows among roots of shrubs and beneath rocks in desert and rocky hillside areas and beach sand of western United States
References in periodicals archive ?
The species included the wedge-tailed shearwater (up-listed from Least Concern to Vulnerable with climate change impacts being a key factor in its decline); the hawksbill turtle (Vulnerable to Endangered); Fassifern blind snake (Least Concern to Vulnerable); yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Least Concern to Vulnerable); the palm cockatoo (Near Threatened to Vulnerable), and the greater glider (Least Concern to Vulnerable).
Eggs of the blind snake, Liotyhplops albirostris, are incubated in a nest of lower fungus-growing ant, Apterostigma cf.
The ALA (2014) and OEH (2014) databases yielded nine records of six species (Table 2), two of which were not detected in the present study: Black-bellied Swamp Snake Hemiaspis signata, one specimen collected in 1996; and Blackish Blind Snake Ramphotyphlops nigrescens, one specimen collected in 1997.
Last year Al Hage also spotted a Brahminy blind snake inside his villa.
Brahminy blind snake, Ramphotyphlops braminus (Daudin, 1803).
Summary: A frog with fangs, a blind snake and a round-headed dolphin are among more than 1,000 new species recently found on the incredible Melanesian island of New Guinea, environment group WWF said.
A FROG with fangs, a blind snake and a round-headed dolphin are among 1,000 new species found on an island by World Wildlife Fund scientists.
Snakes are reportedly illegal in Hawaii, apart from the Hawaiian blind snake.
In this study we will examine the histological anatomy of the oviducts of the brown house snake (Lamprophis fuliginosus), the Brahminy blind snake (Rhamphotyphiops braminus), and the worm lizard, Amphisbaena fuliginosa, to determine if the anatomy of the worm lizard oviduct is more similar to the snakes or lizards.
The blind snake Leptotyphlops goudotii inhabit the dryforests of northwestern Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica, but has not been reported in the insular area of this region.
But in Hawaii--except for the harmless, earthwormlike Brah- miny blind snake, which was introduced to the state from Asia--there are no terrestrial snakes.