blinded

(redirected from blindedly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

blind

 (blīnd)
adj. blind·er, blind·est
1.
a. Sightless.
b. Having a maximal visual acuity of the better eye, after correction by refractive lenses, of one-tenth normal vision or less (20/200 or less on the Snellen test).
c. Of, relating to, or for sightless persons.
2.
a. Performed or made without the benefit of background information that might prejudice the outcome or result: blind taste tests used in marketing studies.
b. Performed without preparation, experience, or knowledge: a blind stab at answering the question.
c. Performed by instruments and without the use of sight: blind navigation.
3. Unable or unwilling to perceive or understand: blind to a lover's faults.
4. Not based on reason or evidence; unquestioning: put blind faith in their leaders.
5. Slang Drunk.
6. Lacking reason or purpose: blind fate; blind choice.
7.
a. Difficult to comprehend or see; illegible.
b. Incompletely or illegibly addressed: blind mail.
c. Hidden from sight: a blind seam.
d. Screened from the view of oncoming motorists: a blind driveway.
e. Secret or otherwise undisclosed: a blind item in a military budget.
8. Closed at one end: a blind socket; a blind passage.
9. Having no opening: a blind wall.
10. Botany Failing to produce flowers or fruits: a blind bud.
n.
1. (used with a pl. verb) Blind people considered as a group. Used with the: a radio station for reading to the blind.
2. often blinds Something, such as a window shade or a Venetian blind, that hinders vision or shuts out light.
3. A shelter for concealing hunters, photographers, or observers of wildlife.
4. Something intended to conceal the true nature, especially of an activity; a subterfuge.
5. A forced bet in poker that is placed before the cards are dealt.
adv.
1.
a. Without seeing; blindly.
b. Without the aid of visual reference: flew blind through the fog.
2. Without forethought or provision; unawares: entered into the scheme blind.
3. Without significant information, especially that might affect an outcome or result: "When you read blind, you see everything but the author" (Margaret Atwood).
4. Informal Into a stupor: drank themselves blind.
5. Used as an intensive: Thieves in the bazaar robbed us blind.
tr.v. blind·ed, blind·ing, blinds
1. To deprive of sight: was blinded in an industrial accident.
2. To dazzle: skiers temporarily blinded by sunlight on snow.
3. To deprive of perception or insight: prejudice that blinded them to the proposal's merits.
4. To withhold light from: Thick shrubs blinded our downstairs windows.

[Middle English, from Old English; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blind′ing·ly adv.
blind′ly adv.
blind′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.blinded - deprived of sightblinded - deprived of sight      
blind, unsighted - unable to see; "a person is blind to the extent that he must devise alternative techniques to do efficiently those things he would do with sight if he had normal vision"--Kenneth Jernigan
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Differential follicle counting and categorizing were performed blindedly.