blister beetle


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blister beetle

n.
Any of various beetles of the family Meloidae, such as the Spanish fly, that secrete cantharidin, a substance that blisters the skin and is toxic to livestock that consume hay contaminated with the beetles. Also called meloid.

blister beetle

n
(Animals) any beetle of the family Meloidae, many of which produce a secretion that blisters the skin. See also Spanish fly

blis′ter bee`tle


n.
any of various beetles of the family Meloidae, many of which produce a secretion capable of blistering the skin.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blister beetle - beetle that produces a secretion that blisters the skinblister beetle - beetle that produces a secretion that blisters the skin
beetle - insect having biting mouthparts and front wings modified to form horny covers overlying the membranous rear wings
family Meloidae, Meloidae - blister beetles
oil beetle - any of various beetles that exude an oily substance from the leg joints that deters enemies
Spanish fly - green beetle of southern Europe
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of the dried body of the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris (Fig.
4,8,18) Originally extracted from the blister beetle but now synthesized commercially, (19) cantharidin causes vesiculation at the dermoepidermal junction (6) by destroying intercellular connections.
Infestations by the blister beetle may cause considerable damage because of the gregarious nature of adult beetles, thereby adversely affecting seed production (9).
INTRODUCTION: Blister Beetle Dermatitis is also known as Paederus Dermatitis, is a type of irritant contact dermatitis with history of sudden onset with erythematous vesicobullous lesions on exposed areas of body.
My immediate thought was the blisters looked like those inflicted by what many commonly call a Blister Beetle.
Key words: Blister beetle dermatitis, epidemiological and clinical study, Paederus.
Handling of individual orthoptearns can result in bites and exposure to noxious defensive chemicals, and large populations of grasshoppers may also indirectly lead to an increase in blister beetle (Meloidae) populations and swarms of locusts can be responsible for allergic reactions and aggravation of asthma, as well as mechanical transmission of disease agents like cholera (Showler 1996).
Coleoptera: Ground beetle, Pasimachus punctatus Haldeman; Blister beetle, Pyrota postica Le Conte; Blister beetles, Epicauta spp.
If a blister beetle is ingested, the consumed cantharidin causes severe irritation of the gastrointestinal tract and inflammation of the kidneys.
Blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae) mortality evaluated during alfalfa harvest.
If blister beetle poisoning is suspected, a local veterinarian should be consulted immediately so treatment can be started.