blockader


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block·ade

 (blŏ-kād′)
n.
1. The isolation of a nation, area, city, or harbor by hostile ships or forces in order to prevent the entrance and exit of traffic and commerce.
2. The forces used to effect this isolation.
tr.v. block·ad·ed, block·ad·ing, block·ades
To set up a blockade against: blockaded the harbor.

[Probably block + -ade (as in barricade).]

block·ad′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Navy Department rewarded him with command of a small blockader off the Carolina coast, where he again compiled a sparkling record.
Surrey is home to the taxpayer-funded "Traditional School" which opened last year after much campaigning from Surrey school trustee and clinic blockader Robert Pickering.
For blockader Crissy Swain, the blockade was about more than the clear-cut logging.
44) Diane Brown, Gaahlaay's granddaughter and a blockader, recognized that when the Elders came to the line, they brought history with them, validating this struggle as a part of the long narrative of the Haida Nation.
The blockader also may not be able to fully surround the defender due to geographic constraints such as border terrain that is difficult to physically control indefinitely, long--thus porous--maritime borders, or adjacent third-party countries that refuse to formally honor the blockade.
It was combined in turn with four poorly water soluble drugs of different properties and biomedical functions: carvedilol (a nonselective adrenergic receptor blocker, indicated in the treatment of mild-to-moderate congestive heart failure), itraconazole (an antifungal agent that impairs ergosterol synthesis, used among others against histoplasmosis, cryptococcal meningitis, and aspergillosis), nevirapine (a potent, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for treatment of HIV infection and AIDS), and nimodipine (a calcium channel blockader with preferential cerebrovascular activity).
Everyone knows that those channels, operated by the criminal blockader itself, are designed to impede the flow of everything and everyone to and from Gaza.
Kitty's appraisal of the blockade's constructive consequences for the Grassy Narrows community immediately reminded me of something Barbara, a woman in her early fifties and also an active blockader, had shared with me several months earlier.
Any patent that creates a blockade without revenue would provide a service to holders of existing patents--mainly to inventors and innovators other than the blockader.
Hunley, a submersible known as the "South's secret weapon," had just turned for shore after sinking the Union blockader USS Housatonic one chilly February night in 1864, when it vanished in Charleston Harbor, S.