blood gas


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blood gas

n.
1. An analysis of the dissolved gases in blood plasma, including oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide.
2. Any of the gases that become dissolved in blood plasma.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blood gas

Any of the dissolved gases in blood plasma, especially oxygen and carbon dioxide.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
[ClickPress, Tue Aug 27 2019] This report studies the current as well as future prospects of the global Blood Gas and Electrolyte Analyzers Market .
Simultaneous blood gas samples including ABG, pVBG, and cVBG were collected within the first 48 hours of MICU admission.
Air bubbles in arterial samples may cause a bias in blood gas measurements, particularly for pC[O.sub.2] and p[O.sub.2].
The information obtained from an ABG analysis includes blood gas, acid base and electrolytes i.e.
We collected venous blood samples from 83 apparently healthy mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula) July 2012-August 2013 on the Texas, USA, Gulf Coast and measured blood gas, electrolyte, biochemical, and hematologic parameters.
There are steps we can take to make sure that the accuracy of the arterial blood gas sample is maintained.
Arterial blood gas analysis is the gold standard by which the adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation are assessed.
Souza Neto and colleagues compared absolute and trending accuracy of hemoglobin values from SpHb (Masimo Radical-7(R) Pulse CO-Oximeter and SpHb adhesive sensor, Revision K) and an invasive laboratory blood gas analyzer (Cobas B221, Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, USA) to hemoglobin values from a hematology analyzer (XE-2100, Sysmex, Kobe, Japan).1 While blood gas analyzers (also referred to as CO-Oximeters) and hematology analyzers are both laboratory devices that analyze blood samples to determine quantitative hemoglobin values, their methodologies are different and according to prior studies, their values are not interchangeable.2
Continued anaerobic and aerobic metabolism in the blood after collection may alter blood gas composition in the interval between drawing arterial blood and its analysis, such as a fall in the Pa[O.sub.2] and pH and a rise in the PaC[O.sub.2].
Conclusion: Although there was a tendency to hyperventilate patients on ventilators in the emergency department in our institution, satisfactory ventilation was achieved almost uniformly after the second blood gas analysis.
The court concluded that, as the plaintiff's expert medical witness testified at trial, the arterial blood gas analysis, as well as the pH level of the infant's blood, should have been performed more frequently in order to determine the infant's condition.