bloodguilt


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blood·guilt

 (blŭd′gĭlt′)
n.
The fact or state of being guilty of murder or bloodshed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bloodguilt

(ˈblʌdˌɡɪlt)
n
guilt of murder or shedding blood
ˈblood-ˌguilty adj
ˈblood-ˌguiltiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bloodguilt - the state of being guilty of bloodshed and murder
guilt, guiltiness - the state of having committed an offense
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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Had been at Posen when Himmler had announced the secret of the Final Solution, bonding the hearers in bloodguilt one to the other.
It usually appears together with other suspected causes, including sorcery (alwanzatar), evil speech (lala-), curse (hurtai-), bloodguilt (eshar), and the like.
(37) In both loci this verb is also associated with blood (dam) and bloodguilt.
David put to death seven sons and grandsons of Saul to expiate the bloodguilt caused by an otherwise unmentioned massacre of the Gibeonites at the hands of Saul (2 Samuel 21:8; Joshua 9).
(155) The complete verse is: "If a thief is found breaking in and is struck so that he dies, there shall be no bloodguilt for him." Exodus 22:2.
But even though one might, like Heiden, reasonably ascribe bloodguilt to Oedipus, no one in the play and its system of judgment does so; nor is such pollution even assigned in Oedipus at Colonus.
'If the thief is seized while tunnelling [through or under a wall for housebreaking] and he is beaten to death [by the householder], there is no bloodguilt in his case [that is, on the part of the householder].
(6) Though given the role of absolving Israel of bloodguilt (Deut21:1-9; 19:8-13), the religious leaders are no longer able to fulfill such a role because of their own bloodguilt (21:33-45; 23:29-36).
A key piece of scripture often cited in objections to same-sex marriage, the passage goes as follows: "If a man lies with a male as one lies with a woman, the two of them have done an abhorrent thing; they shall be put to death--their bloodguilt is upon them." For some reason, this tends to be interpreted as forbidding homosexual sex in general.
The distinction made in the Bible, in the book of Exodus, between daytime and nighttime intrusions is meant to provide a rule of thumb: Because darkness is more dangerous than light, there is no bloodguilt for killing a thief who comes in the night.