bloomed


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bloom 1

 (blo͞om)
n.
1.
a. The flower of a plant.
b. Something resembling the flower of a plant: "Her hair was caught all to one side in a great bloom of frizz" (Anne Tyler).
2.
a. The condition of being in flower: a rose in full bloom.
b. A condition or time of vigor and beauty; prime: "the radiant bloom of Greek genius" (Edith Hamilton).
3. A fresh, rosy complexion: "She was short, plump, and fair, with a fine bloom" (Jane Austen).
4.
a. A waxy or powdery whitish to bluish coating on the surface of certain plant parts, as on cabbage leaves or on a plum or grape.
b. A similar coating, as on newly minted coins.
c. Grayish blotches or streaks on the surface of chocolate produced by the formation of cocoa butter crystals.
d. Chemistry See efflorescence.
5. Glare that is caused by a shiny object reflecting too much light into a camera.
6. A colored area on the surface of a body of water caused by large numbers of phytoplankton, especially cyanobacteria.
v. bloomed, bloom·ing, blooms
v.intr.
1.
a. To bear a flower or flowers.
b. To support plant life in abundance: rains that made the yard bloom.
2. To glow; be radiant: "Our summer-gray potbellied stove bloomed rosy red during winter" (Maya Angelou).
3. To mature or flourish with youth and vigor: genius blooming under a great teacher.
4. To appear or come into being suddenly: "Her pale shoulders bloomed from the green flounces" (Erin McGraw).
v.tr.
1. To cause to flourish.
2. Obsolete To cause to flower.

[Middle English blom, from Old Norse blōm; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

bloom′y adj.
Synonyms: bloom1, blossom, efflorescence, florescence, flower, flush1, prime
These nouns denote a condition or time of greatest vigor and freshness: beauty in full bloom; the blossom of a great romance; the efflorescence of Russian literature; the florescence of Greek civilization; in the flower of youthful enthusiasm; in the flush of their success; the prime of life.

bloom 2

 (blo͞om)
n.
1. A bar of steel prepared for rolling.
2. A mass of wrought iron ready for further working.

[Middle English blome, lump of metal, from Old English blōma; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

bloomed

(bluːmd)
adj
(Photography) photog optics (of a lens) coated with a thin film of magnesium fluoride or some other substance to reduce the amount of light lost by reflection. Also called: coated
References in classic literature ?
Then Violet hung the wreath above the throne, and with weary foot went forth again, out into the cold, dark gardens, and still the golden shadows followed her, and wherever they fell, flowers bloomed and green leaves rustled.
Still the light grew brighter, and floated out into the cold air, where it hung like bright clouds above the dreary gardens, whence all the Spirits' power could not drive it; and green leaves budded on the naked trees, and flowers bloomed; but the Spirits heaped snow upon them, and they bowed their heads and died.
Brightly they bloomed and danced in the soft light, and the Frost-Spirits tried in vain to harm them, for when they came beneath the bright clouds their power to do evil left them.