blow-in

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blow-in

n
1. (Animals) Austral and Irish an unwelcome newcomer or stranger

blow′-in`


adj.
(of a piece of advertising) inserted in but not attached to a magazine or newspaper: blow-in cards.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first one he describes himself in more Irish terms as "the latest of blow-ins," a wanderer who takes up residence in "a flat in the Jewish quarter" of Portobello, home to Lithuanian Jews since the late nineteenth century but now yielding to Arab, African, and other immigrants in the "'monkey puzzle of ancestry." Asians, Africans, Lithuanians all jostle together in these poems, as they do in the changing composition of Ireland itself in recent years.
"They manage to gather up a posse of unlikely locals; retired psychopaths, eccentrics ur tbg and posh people and blow-ins and they end-up getting a team together."
So who's the longest to live here out of all the blow-ins? How do you go about learning Berber?
In the North East, we can add to this the presence of carpet-bagging blow-ins using a local government role in the hope of a Westminster seat in the future.
But many return in later life it seems and, in the meantime, harmony exists between those who have lived on an island all their life and the 'blow-ins' now intent on breathing new life into it with ambitious business projects.
If they don't want to pay, they are not the sort of people who will provide sustainable jobs in sustainable businesses, but blow-ins looking for the best personal deal and the biggest tax break.
If they don't want to pay they are not the sort of people who will provide sustainable jobs in sustainable businesses but blow-ins looking for the best personal deal and the biggest tax break.
It was curious to consider that some of the people walking around must be lineal descendants of those overlaid Celts--or their Italic overlords--or more recent blow-ins, like the Angles, first recorded in this area in the sixth century.
This will not stop complaints from those who will never be satisfied, but they don't matter, because it is the regular racegoer that a racecourse should cater for, not once-a-year blow-ins with their own agendas.
Nan and Jim McDonald, a couple in their mid-forties, live in rural northwest Ireland, where they are still regarded as "blow-ins" even after decades of residency.
BELFAST: Undernourished, cultural disaster area packed with blow-ins who think everywhere else is better, and locals who never leave it and think they're better than everyone.