blowhole


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blow·hole

 (blō′hōl′)
n.
1. An opening or one of a pair of openings for breathing, located on the top of the head of cetaceans, such as whales and dolphins. The blowhole is opened by muscles upon surfacing and closed by the pressure of water upon diving.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals, such as dolphins, come to breathe.
3. A vent to permit the escape of air or other gas.

blowhole

(ˈbləʊˌhəʊl)
n
1. (Zoology) the nostril, paired or single, of whales, situated far back on the skull
2. (Zoology) a hole in ice through which whales, seals, etc, breathe
3. (Building)
a. a vent for air or gas, esp to release fumes from a tunnel, passage, etc
b. NZ a hole emitting gas or steam in a volcanic region
4. (Metallurgy) a bubble-like defect in an ingot resulting from gas being trapped during solidification
5. (Geological Science) geology a hole in a cliff top leading to a sea cave through which air is forced by the action of the sea

blow•hole

(ˈbloʊˌhoʊl)

n.
1. either of two nostrils or spiracles, or a single one, at the top of the head in whales and dolphins, through which they breathe.
2. a hole in the ice to which whales or seals come to breathe.
3. a defect in metal caused by the escape of gas.
[1685–95]

blow·hole

(blō′hōl′)
1. A hole or one of a pair of holes used for breathing and located on top of the head of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals come to breathe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skullblowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skull
cetacean, cetacean mammal, blower - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whales; dolphins; porpoises; narwhals
spiracle - a breathing orifice
2.blowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or airblowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or air
air duct, air passage, airway - a duct that provides ventilation (as in mines)
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
smoke hole - a vent (as in a roof) for smoke to escape
Translations
مَنْفَذُ هَواء
nozdryvětrací/dýchací otvor
åndehul
szelelõlyuk
öndunarop; blástursop
hava deliğinefeslik

blowhole

[ˈbləʊhəʊl] N
1. [of whale] → orificio m nasal
2. (in ice) → brecha f, orificio m (para respirar)

blowhole

[ˈbləʊˌhəʊl] n (Geol) → sfiatatoio

blow2

(bləu) past tense blew (blu) : past participle blown verb
1. (of a current of air) to be moving. The wind blew more strongly.
2. (of eg wind) to cause (something) to move in a given way. The explosion blew off the lid.
3. to be moved by the wind etc. The door must have blown shut.
4. to drive air (upon or into). Please blow into this tube!
5. to make a sound by means of (a musical instrument etc). He blew the horn loudly.
ˈblowhole noun
a breathing-hole (through the ice for seals etc) or a nostril (especially on the head of a whale etc).
ˈblow-lamp, ˈblow-torch noun
a lamp for aiming a very hot flame at a particular spot. The painter burned off the old paint with a blow-lamp.
ˈblowout noun
1. the bursting of a car tyre. That's the second blowout I've had with this car.
2. (on eg an oil rig) a violent escape of gas etc.
ˈblowpipe noun
a tube from which a dart (often poisonous) is blown.
blow one's top
to become very angry. She blew her top when he arrived home late.
blow out
to extinguish or put out (a flame etc) by blowing. The wind blew out the candle; The child blew out the match.
blow over
to pass and become forgotten. The trouble will soon blow over.
blow up
1. to break into pieces, or be broken into pieces, by an explosion. The bridge blew up / was blown up.
2. to fill with air or a gas. He blew up the balloon.
3. to lose one's temper. If he says that again I'll blow up.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new world-class lookouts at the Saddle and the Blowhole will showcase the breathtaking views along the Great Ocean Road, and help visitors learn about the rich cultural heritage and pristine environment in Victorias south-west.
WIKIE the captive killer whale's blowhole speaks more sense than increasingly desperate Conservative Brextremists.
The video was shot in New South Wales, Australia, and features the state's stunning sights including the Kiama Blowhole, the Cronulla sand dunes and Coolangatta Estate.
Fearnbach called positioning directions at a rapid pace that would rival that of a veteran auctioneer, and Durban piloted the hexacopter several feet above the blowhole.
answers Honda 10 1663) (17th The 9 Wymoning, 8 Shields, South 7 questions: 10 Noah, 6 blowhole, A5 Croatia, 4 Sandals, 3 Gorge, 2 Lulu, 1.
Siggy's let me down a couple of times on the trot now, and my Olde Icelandic betting almanac says if it happens again before the Solstice I must tickle a puffin's blowhole to lift the curse
The whale surfaces, shoots air from its blowhole, and submerges again.
Blocking a dolphin's blowhole can cause stress, which increases its chances of experiencing cardiorespiratory failure.
Part of the metal structure extends under the whale's chin and through its mouth, according to Mate, with a bar on top squeezing tightly across its neck, just behind its blowhole.
The absence of the blowhole is perhaps the single most important difference between the conical screw and the more common twin-screw types.
WORKERS in a Saudi Arabia desert have discovered a blowhole that sends sand hundreds of feet into the air.
Mr Stringell said it doesn't seem the porpoise met a violent end: "It had a wound near its blowhole but it doesn't look like something that would have caused a death.