blue ash


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Noun1.blue ash - ash of central and southern United States with bluish-green foliage and hard brown woodblue ash - ash of central and southern United States with bluish-green foliage and hard brown wood
ash tree, ash - any of various deciduous pinnate-leaved ornamental or timber trees of the genus Fraxinus
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References in periodicals archive ?
The facility manufactures indoor lighting products and production is being transferred to the company's Independence, Kentucky and Blue Ash, Ohio facilities.
Brockhoff will be located in the bank's Blue Ash area office, which opened earlier this year.
APSX LLC in Blue Ash, Ohio, is a manufacturer of aftermarket automotive electronics that designed and built its own desktop (7.5-ton) plunger injection machine to mold the plastic parts it needs (see March '17 Close-Up).
Previously, Short-Thompson has been dean of Blue Ash College, a regional college of the University of Cincinnati.
A SMALL cloud of blue ash rose into the air, the incinerated remains of the once-living creature.
Headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, Ascendum has sales and support offices in Hamilton and Blue Ash, OH and New York, NY with offshore delivery centers located in Bangalore and Ahmedabad, India.
Fasteners Having Improved Comfort: Mark James Kline, Okeana, OH; Anna Elizabeth Macura, Cincinnati, OH; Michael Irwin Lawson, Fairfield, OH; and Ronald Joseph Zink, Blue Ash, OH.
Ethicon is a subsidiary of Johnson and Johnson and is headquartered in Blue Ash, Ohio, the US.
Cincinnati, OH, December 23, 2015 --(PR.com)-- Clarissa Fiscus, Buyer Specialist for The Gabbard Team, helped her client purchase a home in Blue Ash. The 3 bedroom 2 bath ranch home is located at 11306 Swing Road Blue Ash, Ohio 45214.
Bur, chinkapin and Shumard oaks, blue ash and kingnut (also called shellbark hickory) are all long-lived trees that have been here for hundreds of years.
The United States is home to several species of ash, including the commercially viable Fraxinus americana (white ash), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), Fraxinus nigra (brown and black ash), Fraxinus latifola and Fraxinus velutina (Oregon ash), and Fraxinus quadrangulata (blue ash).