blue laws


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blue laws

pl n
(Law) history US a number of repressive puritanical laws of the colonial period, forbidding any secular activity on Sundays
References in classic literature ?
That was the time of the Blue Laws, but perhaps it was too rigorous for King John.
Blue laws prevent Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Maine locations from being open on Thanksgiving Day, so remember to check your local store's hours before heading out.
Flanagan said, Small businesses and consumers throughout the state will greatly benefit from this reform of the state's outdated blue laws that will expand Sunday brunch options and promote the continued success of New Yorks service and beverage industries.
Many blue laws have been eased over the years, but in Minnesota--and 13 other states--buying a car is still a no-no on Sundays.
Drawing on the history of Blue Laws and Prohibition, Yandle noted that public policies tend to be supported by "bootleggers," who saw their incomes increase as a result of a particular policy (as bootleggers did under Prohibition and under Blue Laws), and "Baptists," who supported public policies for moral reasons (Baptists tended to support prohibition and Blue Laws because they believed that alcohol was evil).
Even today, remnants of the old Blue Laws still influence state legislation in Massachusetts and elsewhere.
IT ALL STARTED WITH BLUE LAWS, BUT IT ENDED WITH DEDICATED HUNTERS FIGHTING BACK.
Opponents] say the increase in sales would be marginal, but when we look at what happens in other states that repealed blue laws, we see the opposite happens," Gray said.
He was among the first baseball entrepreneurs to install lights for evening games, and he played a key role in challenging Pennsylvania's Blue Laws that were finally overturned in 1934.
Roosevelt embodied the hypocrisy of his fellow social elite, taking full advantage of loopholes in the blue laws that allowed alcohol to flow legally in private clubs and hotel restaurants, second homes for the male gentry.
Last week, he said he was uninterested in contraception and same-sex marriage but hopes to "save the institution of marriage" through policies such as blue laws and tax-deductible marriage counseling.
86) Upon this diverse population, bans on Sunday business seemed to be the work of puritanical forces, representing nothing less than "narrowness and bigotry, and petty tyranny, as were ever developed in Connecticut under the regime of the Blue Laws.