blue supergiant


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Related to blue supergiant: black hole, Blue-white supergiant, Supergiant stars

blue supergiant

n.
A supergiant star with surface temperature ranging from 10,000 to 40,000 kelvin (17,540° to 71,540° F), making the star appear blue-white.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the centre of this image, two blue supergiant stars, called HD 38563A and HD 38563B, shine brightly.
Nature apparently cooks up stars like batches of cookies, with a consistent distribution from massive blue supergiant stars to small red dwarf stars.
Washington, July 12 ( ANI ): XMM-Newton observatory has helped scientists to discover how the Universe's first stars ended their lives in giant explosions from the recent detection of a gamma-ray burst from a massive blue supergiant.
Abstract The unexpected discovery of pulsational frequencies in the light variations of the blue supergiant HD 163899 (B2 Ib/II) has prompted a few groups to re-analysis of pulsational stability in models after Terminal Age Main Sequence (TAMS).
The belt, which looks like three simple kindred stars cinching the midsection, actually consists of a two-star system, a distant blue supergiant, and a triple star - lined up from our vantage point just by chance.
It consists of a blue supergiant star and a cool star.
Before he sold his company to the big blue supergiant in 2004, Aubrey Chernick, the founder and former CEO of Candle Software, is reported to have repeatedly told friends he would sell his company to anyone except IBM.
Gendre's team goes further, suggesting that GRB 111209A marked the death of a blue supergiant containing relatively modest amounts of elements heavier than helium, which astronomers call metals.
A blue supergiant has a much smaller radius than a red supergiant.
Several very bright, pale blue supergiant stars, a solitary ruby-red supergiant and a variety of other brilliantly colored stars are visible in the Hubble image, as well as many much fainter ones.
The red supergiant shrank and became a blue supergiant, a star considerably less swollen but, at 10 times its original diameter, still far from svelte.