blue-green algae


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to blue-green algae: spirulina, cyanobacteria

blue-green algae

pl n
(Microbiology) the former name for cyanobacteria

blue′-green` al′gae


n.pl.
any of various groups of prokaryotic microorganisms of the phylum Cyanophyta, containing chlorophyll and a blue pigment. Also called cyanobacteria.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blue-green algae - predominantly photosynthetic prokaryotic organisms containing a blue pigment in addition to chlorophyllblue-green algae - predominantly photosynthetic prokaryotic organisms containing a blue pigment in addition to chlorophyll; occur singly or in colonies in diverse habitats; important as phytoplankton
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
class Cyanobacteria, class Cyanophyceae, Cyanophyceae - photosynthetic bacteria found in fresh and salt water, having chlorophyll a and phycobilins; once thought to be algae: blue-green algae
nostoc - found in moist places as rounded jellylike colonies
trichodesmium - large colonial bacterium common in tropical open-ocean waters; important in carbon and nitrogen fixation
References in periodicals archive ?
Though most blue-green algae are harmless, some can produce toxic chemicals that cause sickness in people and animals.
The difference between the two is that blue-green algae has deadly effects.A
Blue-green algae blooms may appear as green or greenish-brown scum on the surface of water and can contain toxins that can be harmful to animals if ingested, even in small quantities.
Cheshire Wildlife Trust since closed the lake to the public following the incident, with the presence of blue-green algae confirmed.
"Every day Sepa works to protect and enhance Scotland's environment and our sampling will confirm the presence or absence of blue-green algae in the water.
People commenting on the Facebook post say they have spotted the blue-green algae at other parts of Fleet Pond and are warning dog owners to be on their guard.
A toxicology report confirmed that Kendall's death was caused by the presence of toxic blue-green algae in the water.
Diarrhea, skin rashes, eye irritation, cough, sore throat and headache may be experienced if one swallows, breathes or comes into contact with water contaminated by toxins from blue-green algae. Most algae, however, pose no threat to humans.
Concerns about eating finfish and crustaceans persist for people who live or visit waters affected by blue-green algae and its toxins, which are not only noxious, but are dangerous.
| If you see any suspected appearances of blue-green algae, contact the Environment Agency's incident hotline on 0800 80 70 60.
Blue-green algae are so small they can't be seen unless they are formed into clumps, which look like green flakes or brown dots.
Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, is a microscopic bacteria found in freshwater ponds, lakes, streams and brackish water ecosystems.